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COPYKIG 

1929 

JOE HUMPHREY 

EDITOR^ 

WILLIAM DICKSON 

MAWKGEK 







Tublishtd 
by the Student 
'Association o 

soum/Esmi^ 




Long ago, Scheherayadej the favorite of the Sultan, 
beguiled him with stories known as the "Arabian 
Nights/' planned to win his interest and to post- 
pone the evil day when she would be discarded. In 
this j the twentieth century, we, the staff of the i(j2 9 
"Sou'wester," tell you these tales of college life in 
order to postpo)ie the time when your college days 
will be forgotten and so that Southwestern Univer- 
sity will always hold a pleasant place in your 
thoughts. 





ADMINISTRATION 

CLASSES 

BEAUTIES 

FEATURES 

ORGANIZATIONS 

ATHLETICS 

SOUJOKER 




F 





PRESIDENT KING VIVION 

PRESIDENT OF SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY 

Because of his whole-hearted interest in South- 
western, and his untiring efforts for the success oj 
all undertakings of the University; and because 
of his kindness, helpfulness, optimism and sincer- 
ity, as a genuine Christian gentleman, we, the 
twenty -fourth editorial staff oj the Sou' wester, pay 
this humble but all-meaning homage. 





The Rein Company, Printers 
houston, texas 

Southwestern Engraving Company 
fort worth, texas 

R.J. Stone, Photogragher 





'As he descended, the beautiful domes of his 
palace came into view." 









"They stood awhile to admire its wonderful structure." 

— Arabian Nights 




" In yon secluded citadel, 
Folloivers of black alchemy 
Meet, and tear the ivorld apart. 






\1 




' - , c 






■ 










> 



' ., 



J™: ft. 



'And there a lovely cloistered court be found 
And in the cloister (ivy) twining round 
The slender shafts." 










'Out of the earth a fabric huge 
Rose like an exaltation . ' ' 










••• 









"<>»<» 



'Not Caesar s head on Koman die 
W as limned so sharply to the eye 
As old Southivestern 'gainst the sky." 

— Henry Meyers 




' the fragrant smell ivhich perfumed the air, 

the pleasant shade, were so delightful." 

— Arabian Nights 



N^Mr-r 










'What mortal eye did ever see 
A steeple of such symmetry, — ' 




" Evening ' s golden smile is just as warm, 
And Zephyr s gentle breath is just as sweet 
Here as anywhere." 




ADMINISTRATION 




— 


































Randolph Wood Tinsley, B.S. 
Assistant to President and Bursar 







































































Oscar Alvin Ullrich, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Dean of the Faculty 























- 































Miss Laura Kuykendall, A.B., M.A. 
Dean of Women 









I! 































' 







Myron Lawson Williams, A.B., M.A. 
Proctor-Manager of Mood Hall 














































-^^•~ -^-.^ *- . 















































Sept. 18-19 — Registration for Fall Term 

Sept. 19 — Pirate Night 

Sept. 11 — Faculty Reception at Woman's Building 

Sept. 17 — Pep Rally and "Pajama Parade" 

Oct. 4 — Rainbow Dinner 

Oct. 8 — Pan-Hellenic Tea 

Oct. 11-14 — Federation Conference at Greenville 

Oct. 16-2.0 — Religious Activity Drive 

Nov. 1 — The Eddy Brown String Quartet 

Nov. 11 — "Seated Tea" honoring Mrs. K. Vivion. "Bloc" Smith speaks at "Y. 

Nov. 11 — The Schubert Male Quartet 

Nov. 16 — Open House at Snyder Hall — Epworth League Party 

Nov. 19 — Thanksgiving Program and Dinner at Woman's Building 

Dec. 4 — Maurice G. Hindus speaks 

Dec. 6 — "S" Association Banquet 

Dec. 11 — Carol Service at Woman's Building 

Jan. 1 — Registration for Winter Term 

Jan. 7 — "The Whole Town's Talking" Lyceum 

Jan. 15 — Dr. Herbert Spencer Jennings Lecture 

Jan. 10 — All-College Day at Sunday School 

Jan. 11-2.5 — Dr. E. O. Harbin directs Recreational Institute 

Jan. 18 — Warren Hull Concert 

Jan. 19 — Dr. Harry W. Laidler speaks at Chapel 

Feb. 6 — Election of Publication Officers 

Feb. 8 — Silvertone Quintette entertains 

Feb. 11 — Freshmen win Basketball Title 

Feb. 19-2-3 — Sophomore Week — Judge Tarver speaks in Chapel Feb. 11 

Feb. 18-Mar. 1 — Annual Choir Director's Conference — "The Seven Last Words" 

Mar. 1— Triangle Debate— T.C.U., S.U., Trinity U. 

Mar. 7- 8 — Mask and Wig present "The Show-Off" 

Mar. 14-18 — Choral Club trip 

Mar. 19 — Reigstration for Spring Term 

Mar. 31-Apr. 6 — Easter Revival 

Apr. 1 — Senior Day Picnic 

Apr. 15 — Oscar Seagle Song Recital 

May 16-17 — Mask and Wig Performance 

May 16 — Triangle Debate — S.M.U., S.U., Hendrix College 

June 1- 4 — Fifty-sixth Commencement. 

































■ 












- 











. 



£*w 



Miss Pearl Neas is the lady who conducts the registration ceremonies. If you are 
ever in doubt about any courses, Miss Neas can straighten things out. Under her 
capable leadership, Southwestern has been well represented in the Association of Reg- 
istrars of Texas. 



Mrs. Margaret Mood McKennon is the lady who holds sway over the librarv. Al- 
though she requires the boys to wear their ties and refuses to let the girls chew gum 
in the library, she has a host of friends among the students. She is working hard for 
the proposed Cody Memorial Library. 


















|\ N 




\ I 







SUE SIMPSON 

Secretary to the President 



LOIS CLARKE 

Secretary to the Registrar 



) -J 



) - 





















































Mrs. Georgia B. Bridgers Hostess Woman's Building 

Mrs. Mimmie Wedemeyer Hostess Snyder Hall 

D' Laurel Beville Assistant to Dean of Women 

Mrs. Anne Ferguson Supervisor Woman s Bldg. Infirmary 

George Albert Logan Bookkeeper and Assistant to Bursar 

Mrs. George A. McClain Supervisor Dining Room 

Mrs. Mary Smith Supervisor Mood Hall Infirmary 

W. H. Moses, M.D University Physician 

































M S 












£J 







FACULTY 






























































Herbert Lee Gray, B.A. 
Professor of Bible and Religion 



Wesley Carroll Vaden, B.A., M.A. 
Professor of Latin, Greek and French 




Frederick C.A. Lehmberg, B.A., M.A. John Campbell Godbey, B.A., M.A. 

Professor of German and French Professor of Chemistry 

































5 -J 






- 

























s 4 



>^, i 





Oscar A. Ullrich, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Education 



Claud Howard, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 



Randolph Wood Tinsley, B.S. 

Professor of Geology 



Myron Lawson Williams, B.A., M.A. 
Professor of 
Economics and Sociology 



















' 












i 








































































William Paul Davidson, B.A. Miss Laura Kuykendall, B. A., M.A. 

Professor of Philosophy and Psychology Dean of Women 





George Coone Hester, B.A. , M.A. 

Associate Professor of 
History and Government 



Paul Patterson Young, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Professor of History 















j, i 









' i 

























































Mrs. R. M. Ferguson, B.A., M.A. Katherine Feild Tarver, B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of English Assistant Professor of English 






I 




Annie Edward Barcus, B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of English 




«fc> * v 




Glen Dewitt Willbern, B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Education 









: 












































R. V. Guthrie, Jr., B.A., M.A., M.S. 
Associate Professor of Physics 




Albert Russell Wapple, B.S., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 




























Burnett Steele Ivey, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Spanish 




Rowena Onderdonk, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Spanish 















































Rosemary Walling, B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Education 



Bonner Jones Bruton, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in Chemistry 







Lewis A. Harding, B.A., LL.B. 

Professor of Public Speaki ig 



Robert Venable Brown, B.A., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Biology 





















































































Henry Edwin Meyer 
Dean of Music 




Elizabeth Mills, B.S. 
Instructor in Piano, Voice and Theory 







Mrs. Anita Storrs Gaedcke 

Instructor in Violin 






Mary Elizabeth Brown 

Instructor in Piano 

















































BRANNEN 

CZAROWITZ 

WARE 



BROWN 

GUSMAN 

BEHRNS 



AI.LBRITTEN 

HUMPHREY 

MOET 



HEACOCK 


JETT 


DOERING 


KEITH 


WEIR 


DURRENBERGER 












Student Instructors 



HerscIiel S. Brannen Gymnasium Rayburn Brown. 

Lilian Keith Chemistry 

Student Assistants 



Te 




Leta Weir English 

Francis Czarowitz Economics 

Leo Allbritten Geology 

Paul Jett Orchestra 

Richard Heacock Band 

Ethel Gusman Philosophy 

and Psychology 



Joe Humphrey History 

Anne Marie Doering French 

William R. Ware Chemistry 

John Allen Moet Chemistry 

Lilia Behrns Biology 

Shelton Durrenberger Physics 

Rayburn Brown History 



















MOTHER MORGAN 

'The path of a good woman is indeed strewn with flowers; 
but they rise behind her step, not before them." 

— Ruskin. 


















We now feel less afraid of Death 
Since she is dead. 
Another friend has gone ahead, 
Suggesting what could not he said 
(Not even with her dying breath) 
This side of death. 

II. 

We saw her die and, as she lay 

From day to day 

Drifting like a ship that rides 

Slow and serene 

Down the dark tides 

To the Far Unseen, 

We held our breath, 

(But not in fear), 

We held our breath 

But not in fear of Death, 

The menace, near, 

For He was here. 

III. 

We kneiv it by the words unsaid; 
We saw His light upon her face; 
She was not left to drift alone 
Into the Dim Unknown; 
She was not left without a Friend 
Beyond Life' s End. 

IV. 

How silent are those outward bound! 

Beyond, above our narrow round 

(Of getting what we cannot hold 

In hands that wrinkle and grow old, 

Of spending for the things that must 

Be mingled with us in the dust) 

They seem remote and unconcerned 

With iv hat they leave or what they learned; 

Our only comfort is their smile 

Upon our blindness, 

As if to promise Afterwhile 

Our loving-kindness 

Will be tenderly returned. 




Hers was the silent dignity 

Of all the dead who trusted Him; 

The wise, divine serenity 

That clearer sees when eyes are dim; 

And yet she left us naught that we 

Call "proofs of immortality" . . . 

Except the smile upon her face 

Re fleeted from some happier place; 

Except the sunny memories 

Of mother-love and charities, 

Of the home she made for all 

In her heart within the Hall. 

VI. 

I broke no flower when she died 

To die with her; 

I shed no tears ivith those who sighed 

Lamenting her; 

I saw the good grey minister; 

I watched her "boys" file softly by; 

I heard the tremor in his voice; 

I felt their solemn steps go by . . . 

And in each word and every eye 

Was love that lives in memory. 

VII. 

I was not sad as some grow sad; 
I could not weep as some have ivept; 
I envied her the love she had; 
I envied her the sleep she slept. 
And tho I left no lilies near, 
No sighs, no sobs, nor any tear, 
I felt (as when I vigil kept 
By *Rafael's sleep) no foolish fear 
Of Death before the dead who died 
Befriended by the Crucified. 
Another friend had gone ahead, 
Suggesting what could not be said 
(Not even with her dying breath) 
This side of Death. 

—B. S. I. 



*Rafael Giron, Southwestern student who died in a 
San Antonio hospital during the summer of 192.7. 






























7m fiE^ 






"And there spread out before the students lay 
vast treasures in profusion." 



GLASSES 









































SENIORS 

































































FALL TERM OFFICERS 

Milton Lindell President 

William Dickson Vice President 

Marylee Payne Secretary 

WINTER TERM OFFICERS 

B. F. Jackson, Jr President 

Richard Heacock Vice President 

Gladys Ewing Secretary 

SPRING TERM OFFICERS 

Richard Heacock President 

Lee Foster Vice President 

Beverly Harvey Secretary 



























Clifford M. Allen, B.A. De Leon 

English Major; President Phi Delta 
Theta Winter '2.9; Sigma Tau Delta; 
Megaphone Staff"; Assistant Cartoonist 
'2.9 Sou'wester. 

Clyde Elizabeth Baskin, B.A. Cameron 
Spanish Major; Delta Delta Delta; 
Alamo 'tyvj; Y.W.C.A. 'i-y'xy. 

Lilia Corinne Behrns, B.A. Georgetown 
Biology Major; Student Assistant 
Biology and Chemistry 'i8-'i'9i Uni- 
versity Honor Council 'z8-'i9; San Ja- 
cinto; German Club. 



J. Wesley Blackburn, B.A. Rockdale 
History Major; Football '2^'x8., Cap- 
tain 'z8; Basketball 'x6-'i8; Track '2.6- 
'2.7; Baseball '2.8; Kappa Sigma. 



Mrs. Ella C. Bruton, M.A. Georgetoivn 
History Major: Scholarship Society. 



Marjorie Bryan, B.A 

History Major; Zeta Tau Alpha. 



Austin 


































Ju anita Buller, B.A. Sealy 

English Major; Secretary Phi Mu; 
Y.W.C.A.; San Jacinto. 

Bess Burgin, B.A. Yancey 

Spanish Major; President Y.W.C.A. 
'x8-'2-9; Editor Southwestern Magazine 
'i8-'2_9; Megaphone Staff 'xj-iJSj Pres- 
ident Scholarship Society 'zS-'lc), Honor 
Student; Student Assistant in Spanish 
'7.7-19; Secretary Students' Association 
'i7-'i8; Delta Delta Delta; Epworth 
League Cabinet 'zj-'zS; President Wo- 
man's Bldg. Honor Council 'zj-'iA; 
San Jacinto. 

James Marion Burleson, B.A. Coleman 
Economics Major; Phi Delta Theta. 




Christine Carpenter, B.A. Pendleton 
French Major; Woman's Bldg. Honor 
Council 'xy-'zS; Y.W.C.A. 

Hoyt Cates, B.A. Wilson, Okla. 

Religious Education Major; League 
Cabinet; Y.W.C.A. Cabinet; President 
Life Service Band; Student Federation; 
San Jacinto 't.j-73. 

Manning Clements, B.A. Burnet 

Economics Major; Phi Delta Theta; 
Sigma Tau Delta; Pi Kappa Delta; Glee 
Club '2.6-'i8; Megaphone '±6-'z.j-; Pep 
Squad 'i£; Secretary State Oratorical 
Association '2.8; Executive Committee; 
President Pan-Hellenic Council 'x8-' r ±^; 
Intercollegiate Debate'z6; Mask & Wig. 




































Thera Cocke, B.A. Granger 

Spanish Major; Music Club; Scholar- 
ship Society. 

Elizabeth Dayvault, B.A. Glen Flora 
History Major; Zeta Tau Alpha. 



Hazel Dean Davis, B.A 
History Major. 




Linden 



Bill Dickson, B.A. Ballinger 

Dramatic Literature Major; Pep 
Squad 'xy'tj; Debating Team '15; Vice 
President Freshman Class '-±6; Nomi- 
nating Committee 'ij-'t-cj; Mask and 
Wig \-/-'zS; Pi Kappa Delta; National 
Collegiate Players; President Junior 
Class Winter '18; Kappa Sigma; Bus- 
iness Manager Megaphone '17-' 18; Bus- 
iness Manager of Sou'wester 'zSklzcJ; 
Vice President Senior Class Fall '2.8. 

Elizabeth Dozier, B.A. Taylor 

English Major; Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Camilla Emerson, B.A. Georgetown 

History Major; San Jacinto; Diploma 
in Expression. 













































































Emily Gervis Enochs, B.A. Georgetown 
French Major; Delta Delta Delta; San 
Jacinto '15-16. 






G. Elizabeth Ewing, B.A. Navasota 
Education Major; Y.W.C.A. Cabinet, 
Honor Council '18^x9; Zeta Tau Alpha; 
University Honor Council '%j-'%8. 



Thelma Ferrell, B.A. Valley Mills 
English Major; Music Club '2.8-'%$. 



Vera Avanell Ford, B.A. Dayton 

English Major; Alamo 't.j-'i&, Treas- 
urer '2.8; Y.W.C.A. 












Lee Foster, B.A. Georgetown 

Biology Major; Kappa Alpha. 









William T. Gray, Jr., B.A. Waco 

Dramatic Literature Major; Alamo; 
Pi Kappa Delta; Mask and Wig; Inter- 
collegiate Debate. 



























































Lester Green, B.A. Georgetoivn 

Spanish Major; Band 'xG-'i.^; Vice 
President Sigma Tau Delta '19. 
Ethel Gusman Bay City 

» Philosophy and Psychology Major; 
Student Assistant Philosophy and Psy- 
chology 'i8-'i9; Y.W.C.A.; Woman's 
Bldg. Honor Council '2.7-2.%, President 
'2.8-'z9; San Jacinto; Executive Com- 
mittee; Scholarship Society. 
Beverly Gene Harvey, B.A. Shamrock 
Chemistry Major; Y.W.C.A. Cabinet 
'2.8-'2-9; Choral Club 'zj-'zc); San Jacin- 
to; Epworth League Cabinet 2.8-'x9; 
Student Volunteer; Delta Delta Delta; 
Woman's Bldg. Honor Council 'i8-'2-9. 



Richard K. Heacock, B.A. Georgetown 
Bible and Religion Major; Ministerial 
Association s2,8-'.2.9; Band Leader '2.8- 
'19; Scholarship Society; Vice President 
Senior Class Winter '19; Orchestra 18- 
'2.9. 



R. P. Heizer, B.A. 
History Major. 









Nolanville 






Lucille Kate Hensarling, B.A. Bryan 
English Major; Y.W.C.A. 'xj-'i.^; 
San Jacinto '17-' '2.9. 






































Claire Hodges, B.A. Beaumont 

Dramatic Literature Major; Zeta Tau 
Alpha; Mask and Wig '16-' 18; National 
Collegiate Players '2.7-I2.9, President '18- 
'19; Scholarship Society 'zj-'xy, Vice 
President '18-19; Honor student; Pep 
Squad 'i6-'i7; Y.W.C.A. Cabinet '16- 
'17; Woman's Bldg. Honor Council '16- 
'17; Secretary of Students' Association 
'i8-'i9. 

Marion Lee Hodges, B.A. Martin 

History Major; Kappa Alpha; Foot- 
ball 'i5-'i8. 

M. K. Hotchkiss, B.A. San Antonio 

English Major; Phi Mu; Y.W.C.A.; 
San Jacinto. 



B. F. Jackson, B.A. Miami 

Dramatic Literature Major; Football 
'18; Y.M.C.A., President 'i8-'i9; Senior 
Class President Winter '19. 



- 






Don Johns, B.A. Georgetown 

Sociology and Economics Major; 
Kappa Alpha; Football 'i5-'i8; "S" 
Association. 

Lilian Keith, M.A. Luling 

Chemistry Major; San Jacinto; Sci- 
ence Society; Scholarship Society; Wo- 
man's Bldg. Honor Council '18; Student 
Assistant in Chemistry. 









































Kelly Lawrence, B.A. Bartlett 

Economics Major; Baseball 'xj-'z&; 
Students' Executive Committee '2.8; 
Kappa Alpha; "S" Association. 






B.A. 



Milton H. Lindell, B.A. Georgetown 
Dramatic Literature Major; National 
Collegiate Players; Pi Kappa Delta; 
Mask and Wig 'i6-'x8.j Debate 'i.yx%; 
President Junior Class Fall '2.7; Glee 
Club \y'x6; Executive Committee '2.8; 
President Senior Class Fall '2.8. 

Miriam Loewenstein, B.A. Rockdale 
English Major; Zeta Tau Alpha. 



Charles Long, B.A. Atlanta 

Economics Major; Mood Hall Honor 
Council '2.7-' 2.8. 

Mrs. M. W. Lovell, Jr., B.A. Temple 
Philosophy Major; Alpha Delta Pi. 

Mrs. Alice M. Marsh, B.A. Georgetown 
English Major; Sigma Tau Delta '2.7- 
'19; Writers' Club; Scholarship Society 
'2.8; Honor Student '18; Supt. Primary 
Department Methodist Sunday School 
'2.7-' 2.9; Assistant Superintendent Ep- 
worth Hi League 'xS-'z^; President 
Sigma Tau Delta '2,8-0.5. 




f * 
























































Evelyn C. Marsh, B.A. Georgetown 

Spanish Major; Scholarship Society; 
Honor Student; Sunday School Teacher 
Primary Department '-xj-z.8; Vice Pres- 
ident Epworth League 'zj-'zS; Alamo 
Society 'tG-'tj. 

Riley Marshall, B.A. Moody 

History Major; Kappa Alpha; Pan- 
Hellenic 'i8-'i9. 

Lila Martin, B.A. Lampasas 

Psychology and Philosophy Major 
Choral Club 'ty'iG; Alpha Delta Pi 
Orchestra '2. 6- '18; Pan-Hellenic '2-7-'z8 
Y.W.C.A.; University Honor Council 
'i7-'l8; Pep Squad '2.7-' 2.8; Secretary- 
Treasurer Pan-Hellenic 'ly-'iS. 



Alvin Mauldin, B.A. Italy 

Bible Major; Ministerial Association 

'iS-'io. 

J 

Bernard L. McCord, B.A. Richland 
Bible and Religion Major; Ministerial 
Association 'zj-'o.^, Vice President '2.8- 
'19; Y.M.C.A.; San Jacinto, Vice Pres- 
ident Fall '18. 

Edwin Mikulik, B.A. Shiner 

Philosophy and Psychology Major; 
Kappa Alpha; Athletic Council; Basket- 
ball '2.6-' 2.8; Baseball ' 2.6-' 2.8, Captain 
elect '19; Football Squad '2.7; "S" Asso- 
ciation. 










■ 



















































Carrie Lucile Myers, B.A. Wharton 
Sociology and Economics Major; 
i7-'i9; Alamo \j-'z&; 



Choral Club 
Y.W.C.A 



Alfred B. Nichols, B.A. Fort Worth 
Bible Major; Ministerial Association, 
President \%-i.^; Mood Hall Honor 
Council 'iS-'zy; University Honor Coun- 
cil 'i8-'i9; Head Waiter 'zS-'icj. 

Gladys E. Noble, B.A. Round Rock 

Dramatic Literature Major; President 
Pan-Hellenic 'xS-'-l^; Delta Delta Delta 
President '2.8-'z<^; Mask and Wig 'z8- 
'19; Y.W.C.A. 'i6-'i9; Alamo. 



Eunice O'Hara, B.A. Diboll 

History Major; Zeta Tau Alpha; Y.- 
W.C.A. 'z7-'i8; Pep Squad 'ly-'iS; Sec- 
retary Zeta Tau Alpha 'i8-'i9. 

Marylee Payne, B.A. San Angela 

English Major; Choral Club '16; Wo- 
man's Bldg. Honor Council '2.6-'z9; 
Y.W.C.A. Cabinet 'zy-'iS; Pep Squad 
'xy- x8; San Jacinto; Secretary Senior 
Class Fall 'i8-'i9; Vice President Stu- 
ents' Association 'zS-'iy; Delta Delta 
Delta; Nominating Committee Intra- 
mural Council. 

O. F. Perry, B.A. Liberty Hill 

History Major; Football; Basketball; 
Baseball. 







- 






















Mary E. Pope, B.A. San Antonio 

English Major; Delta Delta Delta; 

Pan-Hellenic '1&-1.9; Y.W.C.A. ^7-19; 

San Jacinto 'ij-'i.^. 



Claude Porter, B.A. Georgetown 

French Major; Zeta Tau Alpha; 
Choral Club; Music Club. 



Robert Simmonds, B.A. 
Economics Major. 



Temple 






Cleo Smith, B.A. Marble Falls 

Psychology and Philosophy Major; 
University Honor Council ~%8-'x^; Pep 
Squad 'i7-'i8; Y.W.C.A.; Pan-Hellenic 
Council 'i8-'2_9; Secretary Junior Class 
Winter '18. 

Jean Smith, B.A. Mexia 

English Major; Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Tennessee Spencer, B.A. San Antonio 
English Major; Alpha Delta Pi; 
Choral Club 'xy'1.6; Treasurer of Fresh- 
man Class '2.5-2.6; Pan-Hellenic '2.7- '2.8; 
Mask and Wig, 'i7-'i8; Pep Squad '2.6- 
'2.7; Y.W.C.A.; Belle of Southwestern 
'2.7 Pageant. 












































' 





Tula Lee Stone, B.A. Georgetown 

Spanish Major; Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Weldon Teague, B.A. Moody 

Bible Major; Mask and Wig '15; Pres- 
ident of Ministerial Association '15; 
President Methodist Student Federation 
'i.y-%6; President San Jacinto '2.6; Mood 
Hall Honor Council 'zG-zj; Y.M.C.A. 
Cabinet \4-\6; Editor Megaphone 'z6- 
'zj; President University Honor Council 
'iS-'zg. 



John Kennard Thomas, B.A. Anderson 
Economics Major; Kappa Alpha. 



La Verne S. Vineyard, B.A. Wharton 
Dramatic Literature Major; Y.W.- 
C.A. Cabinet 'zG-'zj; Mask and Wig 
'i7-'z8; Scholarship Society 'zj-'zy; 
Pan-Hellenic 'zj-'zS; Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Aubrey I. Walton, B.A. Hamilton 

English Major; Music Club '2.8; Life 
Service Band '18. 

Lewis T. Warinner, B.A. Eddy 

Economics Major; Kappa Alpha; Pep 
Squad '2.5-' 2.7; Sanjacinto 'zy'zG; Assis- 
tant Editor Sou'wester 'z6-'zj; Y.M.C.- 
A. Cabinet ',±6-'.2.j; University Honor 
Council 'xy-'i.8; President Junior Class 
'2.7-' 2.8; President Students' Association 
'x8-'xg ; Pan-Hellenic Council '2_6-'2.c). 
























































William J. Weimer, B.A. Mt. Pleasant 
Bible and Religion Major; Ministerial 
Association; Epworth League. 

Leta Weir, B.A. Weir 

English Major; Student Assistant in 
English '18-19; Scholarship Society. 

Ida Lois Williams, B.A. Fort Worth 
Economics Major; Phi Mu; President 
Alamo Fall '17; Mask and Wig '17; 
Y.W.C.A. Cabinet 'i7-'i8; Woman's 
Bldg. Honor Council '18; Pan-Hellenic 
Council '18. 



Jewell Williamson, B.A. London 

Spanish Major; Scholarship Society; 
Honor Student; Woman's Bldg. Honor 
Council '18 -'19; Secretary - Treasurer 
Scholarship Society 'i8-'i9; Phi Mu. 

Evelyn Wilson, B.A. Hondo 

History Major; Choral Club 'i6-'i8; 
Y.W.C.A. Secretary '18; San Jacinto. 

Mrs. Paul Young, B.A. Georgetown 

English Major; Alpha Delta Pi. 













































JUNIORS 

































































FALL TERM OFFICERS 

Rayburn Brown President 

Walter Pyle Vice President 

Ione Wilson Secretary 

WINTER TERM OFFICERS 

Jesse Thomas President 

Gordon Barr Vice President 

Ione Wilson Secretary 

SPRING TERM OFFICERS 

Leo Allbritten President 

Charles Long Vice President 

Hazel Davis Secretary 












































Leo T. Allbritten Weslaco Gordon Barr Llano 

Aubra Anderson Houston Imogene Beard Jacksonville 

Allen L. Andrews San Antonio J. Ernest Bell Joplin, Missouri 

Buford C. Banks Runge Elmer E. Benson El Campo 








5 - 






/ i 



\ 















































Carl W. Bergquist Georgetown J. Frank Clark, Jr Aquilla 

Herschel S. Brannen Trinity Tom Clarke Florence 

Rayburn Brown Big Spring William B. Clark Robstoivn 

Iva Lee Clark Tborndale Martha Cottingham Elgin 

1 









































• 















Caro Crawford . 





.... Oakburst 


Hazel Deffebach Fort Worth 










Francis H. Czarowitz 


Bartlett 


Clarissa Elizabeth Emert . . . Comanche 










Stoner Daniel . . 




San Antonio 


Isabel Fischer Brenbam 






Tom D. Fowler Georgetown 


Jessie Davis 




Houston 





























































































































Mary Elizabeth Fox Granger Mrs. L. L. Gafford Cranfills Gap 

Edwin Franklin Troy Shelton Smith Gafford Marlin 

C. D. Fulkes Round Rock Vesta Lib Garry . Taylor 

Alvin Spencer Gafford. .Cranfills Gap Dave L. Gates Oakivood 





















































^ 

























Anna Grove :• Harli 



ngen 



Paul B. Guenzel Georgetown 



Mary Elma 



Hinds Co 



lorado 






Berta Greene Goodson Comanche Joe Humphrey . 



. Georgetown 



Edgar F. Imle Marshall, Illinois 

Jim Jett Georgetown 

Edith Rose Belle Johnson. .Round Kock 
































Hazel M. Johnson Stephenville Olivia Liese. 



. Georgetown 



Lillian E. Kennedy Galveston Leslie A. McDaniel. 



. Burnet 






Ossie Mae Lanier Llano Melba McKee. 



.Jacksonville 



Dorothy Lassiter Elkhart John Allen Moet La Feria 






























































F. A. Mood Georgetown Merle Perry Georgetown 

Erma Kathleen Moore Temple Helen Phillips Texas City 



Alfredo Nanez 



etown 



W. Walter Pyle Georgetown 






Walter Herndon Nelson Goldthtvaite Erette 



Reese 



. Brenham 




































































Norma Lee Robertson Goldthwaite Margaret Elisabeth Shivers . .Crockett 



E. W. Rowland . 



. San Antonio 



Wanda Smith. . Deiveyville 
























Virginia Ryman. 



Houston 



Robert Safley Belton 



Vivian Smith Austin 



...,. 






R. Frank Stone : Midlothian 



. 
















-- 










































' 













Elizabeth Tarver Corsicana O. C. Wade. 



Rockwall 



Laurinda Temple Weatherford A. M. Waldrop, Jr Bryan 



Tesse Thomas Ennis 

James F. Trammell Ireland 






Martha R. Wallace Beaumont 



William Robert Ware Hillsboro 


































































Ione Wilson 



William Wisdom 



Troup 



Temple 



Fred Mills Young Cameron 

Emma Pearl Clement Thorndale 






Irene Wyatt Georgetown Mary Elizabeth Green Rosebud 



Florence J. Yearwood Georgetown 



Florine Stocklas Rosebud 















































































^52^-^1111 












SOPHOMORES 































A 





















FALL TERM OFFICERS 

Andy Andrews President 

Alton Smith Vice President 

Ethel Stinson Secretary 

WINTER TERM OFFICERS 

Alton Smith President 

Shelton Durrenberger Vice President 

Cecil Glasscock Secretary 

SPRING TERM OFFICERS 

Robert Safley President 

Ed Franklin Vice President 

George Knopp Secretary 

(Due to Safley's failure to return to school the spring 
term R. C. Dansby was elected to fill the place.) 







M 









V 




-V5* 



Annie Ruth Adair Johnson City 

Vivian Adams Georgetown 

Edgar Juston Allamon Belton 

Leigh Andrews San Antonio 

Elise A vinger Sulphur Springs 

Nancy Enid Avriett Lamesa 

William Bernard Barrett Temple 

Marie Elizabeth Berger Houston 

Iola Mae Bishop Georgetown 

Mary Frances Bowers Granger 



Gordon Brooks Bellville 

Mary Elizabeth Brown Pendleton 

Mary Sue Burcham Georgetown 

Leroy H. Buss Donna 

Johnnie Lee Carlisle McKinney 

Margaret Cates Georgetown 

William Clark Lockhart 

Jack Clement Thomdale 

Enoch H. Cook Taft 

* 

James Elgin Cook \ Thornton 






> - 







' 



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)^i 





■**» ^*ZWWW % -»- %„+-+ 










































R. C. Dansby Bryan 

Merle Davenport Marlingen 

George R. Davis Georgetown 

Mary Frances Davis Nederland 

Ruth Dayvault Glen Flora 

Nancy de Bruin Dallas 

Doris Dickerson Garden City 

Anne Marie Doering Dayton 

Shelton Durrenberger . Copperas Cove 
Percival Rice Eddins Marl in 



Clift M. Epps Pharr 

Jefferson N. Faith Bertram 

Ruth Featherston Goldthivaite 

Beulah Mae Fondon Bay City 

Gertrude Foster Georgetown 

Carter Braxton Fuller Lufkin 

William Gillett Cuero 

Ethel Anna Girvin Georgetown 

C Reagan Glasscock. Mercedes 

Roy Greenwaldt '. . . De Leon 


















































Lonie Grote San Antonio 

Glenn Thomson Guthrie . . . .Coahoma 

Aleen Hardin Georgetown 

Lucille Frances Hargrove Troy 

Bernie H. Hart Richland Springs 

La Valdis Hawkins Bertram 

Martha Jane Hill Georgetoivn 

Lorraine Hodges Taft 

Marion Holmes Temple 

Leora Horger Hondo 



Julia Hyman Rosebnc 

Robert Lee Jancik Caldwell 

Paul N. Jett Georgetoivn 

Lloyd Johns Georgetoivn 

Grace Elizabeth Johnson . . Georgetown 

Odessa Fae Johnson Marl in 

Lucy B. Jones Math is 

George Keene, Jr San Antonio 

Ruth Kennedy Grapeland 

Homer Earl King Hondo 































Elizabeth Klein Harlingen 

George Knopp Leander 

Ernest L. Kurth Keltys 

Marvin M. Landrum, Jr. . . .Lampasas 

Buster Lang ford Georgetown 

Frances Letbetter ...:.. Bertram 

Elmer N. Martin Itasca 

W. Kenneth Matthews La Feria 

J. F. McCrabb -; Cuero 

Johnnie Mercer . . Georgetown 



Allene Morris McGregor 

Marie Moses Georgetoivn 

Herbert Moss, Jr Groveton 

Arthur W. P. Munk Staples 

Brantley A. Myers Gonzales 

Bruce G. Myers Luling 

Thomas B. Newberry Chihuihua, Mex. 

Agnes Marie Noble Belton 

Catherine Pettus Dallas 

Alfred William Phifer Normangee 




At 






> : i 



















71 



lI 




Leslie Rawls Waco 

Annie May Read Silsbee 

Nina Reavis Florence 

Elizabeth Reed Beaumont 

Verena Reed Memphis 

Virginia Regnell Evanston, III. 

Herschel S. Richeson Granger 

De Levah Ross Bertram 

T 

J onnie Koss Lometa 

Cecil Scarborough Eagle Pass 



Corine Schmidt Crockett 

Edna Mae Scott . McCamey 

Vance Seamans . Weslaco 

Ruth Seargeant Bertram 

Earl Seigle Caldwell 

Claude W. Sellers Temple 

T. C. Sharp, Jr Humble 

W. A. Shofner. . . : .Killeen 

Alton Leslie Smith Lufkin 

Dora Deane Smith Lometa 






















H 






/ \ 



































W. Maner Stafford Wharton 

William I. Stevenson Groveton 

Ethel Stinson San Antonio 

Frances Stone Georgetoiun 

Mattison L. Storey Glen Rose 

Bob Sutton Raymondv/lle 

Madison Thomas Woodsboro 

Lillian Blanche Thompson . . . Amarillo 

Lois Thornton Dallas 

Charlie Tunnell Stamford 



Christine Walker Hutto 

Fay Walker Hutto 

Clyde Whittle Lawn 

Sam Wilcox . . . : Georgetown 

Wesley H. Wiley ha Feria 

Hester Williams Georgetown 

Montie J. Williams Bertram 

Weldon Williams Thornton 

Marion Milton Woods Georgetown 

Ruth Yearwood Georgetoivn 















































FRESHMEN 













' 





























FALL TERM OFFICERS 

Wailes Gray President 

James Harris Vice 'President 

Florence Elliott Secretary 

WINTER TERM OFFICERS 

Henry Fox President 

Bob Kercheville Vice President 

Vivian Adams Secretary 

SPING TERM OFFICERS 

Kermit Gibbons President 

Will Mann Richardson Vice President 

Dorothy Denson Secretary 































I' . 

























Margaret Abney Lampasas 

Alwyn K. Addison Caldwell 

Emily Alcala Houston 

Chester Allen Georgetown 

Lawrence Allison Sabinal 



Rhea E. Anderson Olney 



Eli Aronson . 
Edwin Atlee. 



Elgi 






..... San Antonio 



Elmo Bagby Georgetown 



Kathryn Baggett. 



0%pna 



Lena Belle Baskin Cameron 

Mary Belle Batte . .Cameron 

Bernice Virginia Becker Brenham 

George W. Bennett Midlothian 

Annie Bishop Georgetown 

Ruth Bishop Georgetoivn 

William Martin Blackburn. .Rockdale 

Howard M. Bomar Gulf 

M. U. Borden Houston 

Joseph S. Bowles, Jr Groveton 






























tt 

C. H. Bradley, Jr Groveton 

William Branch Georgetown 

Thomas S. Brandon Palacios 

Mary Kuhn Browning Coleman 

Lina Brunson Smithville 

Effie Opal Bryson Bertram 

Herman Raynor Burch Bertram 

Rufus Odell Burns. . . Waco 

Annie Lois Butler Georgetown 

Margaret Caldwell Odem 



Mary Lou Carlton Gatesville 

Dorothy Cavitt Holland 

Mary Ruth Chance Liberty Hill 

George L. Chapman Georgetown 

Cecil H. Childre Weslaco 

Edwina Chrietzberg Georgetown 

Cleburne M. Coffey. .Richland Springs 

Virginia Coffey Richland Springs 

Henry W. Cortes Houston 

Clifton W. Coston Ireland 
















































Clovis Cox Sweetwater 

Clorene Crawford Bertram 

Hazel Cutcher Lockhart 

Dorothy Davis Nederland 

Jane Davis Nederland 

Jenny Davis Georgetown 

Willis Davis Sweetwater 

Edwin M. Day Cameron 

Dorothy Dell Denson Cameron 

Ruby Lee Dickerson Goldthivatte 



Mary Donham Georgetown 

Frank A. Driskill Crockett 

Dwight Leldon DuPuy Mexia 

Virginia Edwards Bellville 

Florence Elliott Thomdale 

Tom O. Ericson Georgetown 

Emily Flanigan Midland 

Harriett Flinn Cameron 

Victor R. Foerster. . . Castell 

Henry B. Fox Granger 











































































Gordon Gantt 




Round Rock 


Charles Gates 




Midlothian . 


Annie Laura Gayle 




Angle ton ] 


Kermit Gibbons 




. .Hallettsville 


Agnes Glasscock 




Mercedes < 


Lillian Gorzycki 




College Station 


Wailes Gray 




Georgetown 


Montie Grimes 


Richland Springs 


Louise Hardin 




. . Gates in lie '. 


Anna Mae Hardy. . 




Houston 



James Harris Georgetown 

Nelle Jewell Harris Georgetown 

Marshall R. Hart. . . .Richland Springs 

Louise Hartmann Temple 

Olan Higginbotham Bel ton 

Harry Hodges Georgetown 

Le Moyne Hodges Taft 

Lucile Mae Hodges Georgetown 

Zenada Huckabee Salado 

Lucinda Mae Isaacs Georgetown 





























Ruth Jamar Austin 

Eunice James Lovington, N. Mex. 

Royal Pearson Jeter Cameron 

Martin Johnson Hutto 

Loise Jones Holland 

Geneva Irene Kattes . Richland Springs 
May Kavanaugh . . 
Lester L. Keyser . 



Liberty Hill 

Castell 



Marie Kilgore Beaumont 



Bob Kercheville. . . . 



J. Cecil Landrum Liberty Hill 

Robert Lee Thomdale 

Thelma W. Legg Georgetown 

Mae Belle Lehmberg Crockett 

J. Sylvester Lewis Lampasas 

Greta Little Goldthivaite 

Bennie W. Lorenz Valley Mills 

Johnnie Lorenz Valley Mills 

Joe Luna Bay City 

LeNita Macune San Saba 





























Lucy Martin . .Haskell 

Mabelle Martin Beaumont 

Franklin A. Martinson Gregory 

Lilburn May Georgetown 

Lurene McAfee Kerens 

Eulalie McCall '.College Station 

Louis L. McCauley Brookshire 

Mary Lee McCrabb Tbomaston 

Harley R. McDaniel Otto 

Irene McDonald Georgetown 



Charley Mae McKewen . . . Huntington 

Josephine Alice McNabb Houston 

Lucile McWhorter Sterling City 

Marguerite Meektns Trinity 

Felix O. Melburn Georgetown 

William Mennis Fort Worth 

Dorothy Jean Miller Houston 

Thelma E. Mock Troup 

Ernest L. Morris .Mc Allen 

William P. Murray La Feria 






















■ 































Norma Myers Luling 

Mabel D. Nall Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Alfonso Naranjo . . . Lampa%ps, Mexico 

Gladys L. Neitsch ■. . .Holland 

Evelyn Nelson Goldthivaite 

Oliver Newton Bertram 

Eleanor Nipper Brackettville 

Wilburn Oatman, Jr. Llano 

Thomas Gillett Park Jourdanton 

Cecil Pennington Georgetown 



Catherine Porter Dallas 

Garnett Porter Lufkin 

Ellis C. Power Gainesville 

Katharine Price Georgetown 

Helen Purl Georgetown 

Walter Scott Pyle Georgetown 

Madge C. Quebedeaux Georgetown 

Evelyn Raetzsch Marfa 

Ella Ramsey Jarrell 

Anna Reavis Florence 


























































Roy Allen Richardson Kockivood 

Will Mann Richardson. . .Georgetown 

Lawson Rivers Elgin 

Esther Saathoff Hondo 

Ella Nora Sander Bellville 

John Sanders Electra 

Eula Mae Scarborough . . . . Eagle Pass 

Charles Schweers Hondo 

P. G. Secrest, Jr Bay City 

Foye Sterling Sellars Houston 



Waldine Margaret Sellstrom Manor 

Annie Lucile Smith Lampasas 

George Smith Belton 



Louise Smith. 






. Lometa 






Bessie Snow Bertram 

James L. Stewart Georgetown 

Edith May Stinson San Antonio 

Mary Catherine Stone Georgetown 

Robert Morris Studer Ireland 



W. R. Stump. 



Georgetown 














































) - 




\ s < 






) - 






Wilma Sullivan Bertram 

J. Glenn Terry Richland Springs 

Margaret Thies Georgetown 

Mildred Thies Georgetoivn 

Annie Beth Thomason Haskell 

Uralee Thurman Rocksprings 

Lora Ophelia Thurmond Pearsall 

Glen Tyler Waco 

Marion Ray Urban San Antonio 

Herschel Vaughan Liberty Hill 



Annie Pope Walker Hamilton 

Fred Walker Hutto 

Mary Maude Wedemeyer . . Georgetoivn 

Willie Weir Weir 

Duncan Whiteside Georgetown 

Ruth Wilcox Bryan 

Hallie Wilcox Georgetown 

James Angus Wyatt Georgetown 

Lulu Young Smithville 

Reba Young Cameron 









m*d >».,> 









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He arrived within a palace of shining marble 
where dwelt the beauties of the realm." 








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Gladys \noble 








































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'Come together ivith me that we may roam to- 
gether in the land of pictures." 




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Collegiate 





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'Many different tribes were formed and each 
iv as loyal to its leader. 





ON 













PUBLICATIONS 


















Gordon Barr Assistant Editor 

J. Frank Clark. Assistant Editor 

J. Ernest Bell Assistant Manager 

William Gillett Assistant Manager 

Ravburn Brown Sports Editor 

Leo Allbritten Assistant Sports Editor 

Dave L. Gates Assistant Sports Editor 



Mary Lee Payne Literary Editor 

Ione Wilson Literary Editor 

Mary Frances Davis Literary Editor 

Wailes Gray Snap Shot Editor 

Henry Fox Snap Shot Editor 

James Trammell Class Editor 

Mary Kuhn Browning Class Editor 



















ROWN 


BELL 




BARR 


CLARK 


ALLBRITTEN 






WILSON 


GATES 




TRAMMELL 


GILLETT 


PAYNE 






BROWNING 




GRAY 

The 


FOX 

Snuwesten 




DAVIS 





























Joe Humphrey, Editor 



William Dickson, Manager 



















1 A1.1.BRITTEN 


CLARK 


ALLAMON 


ALLEN 


WILSON TRAMMELL 


RVMAN 


WILCOX 


STINSON 


GLASSCOCK 


ADAMS 


DAY 


LORENZ 



The Megaphone 



Walter Pvle Assistant Business Manager 

Edgar Allamon Associate Editor 

Virginia Rvman Assistant Editor 

Leo Allbritten Sports Editor 

J. Frank Clark Assistant Editor 

Clifford Allen Sports Editor 

Ione Wilson Society Editor 



James Trammell Reporter 

Samuel Wilcox. . . .Assistant Business Manager 

Edith Stinson Reporter 

Cecil Glasscock Reporter 

Vivian Adams Literary Editor 

Edwin Day Circulation Manager 

Bexnie Lorenz Circulation Manager 










Rayburn Brown, Editor 



Dave L. Gates, Manager 





























The Southwestern Magazine 



Jesse Thomas Assistant Editor 

Carter B. Fuller Assistant Editor 

J. Frank Clark Feature Editor 

Paul Jett 



Buford Banks Assistant Manager 

Tom C. Sharp Assistant Manager 

Virginia Ryman Associate Editor 

Cartoonist 
















Bess Burgin, Editor 



Walter Pvi.e, Manager 


















■ 





CAMPUS 












































PAYNE 



WARINNER 



The Students' Association 

Lewis Warinner President 

Marylee Payne Vice President 

Claire Hodges. . Secretary Treasurer 

The Student's Association of Southwestern University comprises every regularly 
registered student in residence at the institution. The constitution of the Association 
includes provisions for the organization, officers, officers of student publications, 
executive committee, nominating committee and the honor system. 

The officers of the Association are elected on the second Tuesday of May to act for 
the following school year. The editors and managers of the three publications of the 
Association are elected in the first week of February. 

The nominating committee is composed of the officers of the Students' Association, 
the officers of the publications, and the executive committee. 

The honor system, controlled by the Students' Association, presumes that every 
student is a lady or a gentleman. Certain violations of the code of honor are defined 
in the constitution and are punishable if a student is convicted before the Council of 
Honor. This Council is composed of nine members: four seniors, three juniors, and 
two sophomores. 

The Students' Association serves to unify and govern many campus activities. 






































































""N/ 










LINDELL LAWRENCE JACKSON CLEMENTS 

BARR GUSMAN THOMAS 



The Executive Committee 




ARTICLE III 

Section i. (a) The Students' Association shall elect an executive committee. 

(b) This committee shall be composed of seven members, at least three of whom 
shall be seniors. 

(c) The president of the Students' Association shall be ex-officio chairman of the 
executive committee. 

(d) The executive committee shall receive and examine the reports of the publica- 
tions and shall exercise such authority as the Students' Association shall delegate 
to it. 

The executive committee is usually elected the first week of the Fall Term. 
Although there are only three seniors required to serve on the executive committee, 
five were elected this year. The other two members were juniors. 









) - 










































. " 



l\ N 












TEAGUE 

DOERING 



BEHRNS 



GOODSON 



SMITH 



THOMAS 
CLARK 



University Honor Council 
article v 

Section i. The honor system assumes that every student is a gentleman or a lady 
and requires that he or she shall act as such in every college activity. Any violation 
of this principle in any phase of college life is a violation of the honor system. 

Section 2. All members of the student body are honor bound to take cognizance of 
and report to a member of the Honor Council any violation of any principle included 
in the scope of the honor system. 

Section }. Each student shall take the following pledge, with his signature, on every 
examination or test paper or on any other material that the instructor may designate: 
"I pledge my honor that I have neither given nor received help on this test (or exami- 
nation), nor have I seen anyone else do so." Any student that fails to sign such a 
pledge in full must state his reasons for not doing so. 

Section 6. Honor Council, (a) There shall be an Honor Council, known as the 
Southwestern University Honor Council, consisting of nine members. 

(b) The members shall be elected as follows: The senior class shall elect four repre- 
sentatives, the junior class shall elect three representatives, the sophomore class shall 
elect two representatives. The respective classes shall elect their representatives during 
the first two weeks of the Fall Term. 

(c) A man from the senior class who is a representative to the Honor Council shall 
be elected president of the Council by its members at the regular meeting in the Fall 
Term. 



M 



- 



fO~mi 



8 / 



4 









































THOMAS 

CLARK 



CLARK 

BARR 



NICHOLS 

BANKS 



BROWN 

ANDREWS 



Aiood Hall Honor Council 

The Mood Hall Honor Council is the official body through which the boys of Mood 
Hall govern themselves. The self-government association of the Hall is founded on 
the honor system and residents of the Hall are honor bound to report violations of 
regulations to the Honor Council. Its duties are to enforce the regulations outlined in 
the Mood Hall constitution. Its goal is to help in establishing a more efficient honor 
system and to better the living conditions at Mood Hall. 

Mood Hall's Honor Council has been one of the most efficient for several years. 
Under the capable leadership of its president, Jesse Thomas, and the backing of the 
Mood Hall boys, the standards have been raised this year. 

















I 



- 



) - 



Cc 



c 



I 







>'- 
































GUSMAN 


WILSON 


PAYNE CARLISLE 


TARVER 


DICKERSON 


REESE 


WILLIAMS 


WILLIAMSON RYMAN 


EWING 


HARVEY 


















The Woman's Building Honor Council 

The Woman's Building Honor Council is composed cf twelve girls elected from the 
three upper classes, and charged with the duty of judging the cases of misconduct of 
girls living within the Woman's Building. 






Ethel Gusman 
Ione Wilson 
Marylee Payne 
Johnnie Lee Carlisle 
Elizabeth Tarver 
Doris Dickerson 



Erette Reese 
Lois Williams 
Jewel Williamson 
Virginia Ryman 
Gladys Ewing 
Beverly Harvey 









THE HONOR COUNCIL OF THE WOMAN'S BUILDING 









To direct 
rather 
Than demand 



To protect 

rather 

Than prosecute 


















To develop 

rather 

Than destroy 















BURGIN CATES WILSON HARVEY RYMAN GUSMAN 

FOX STINSON DAVIS WILSON CARLISLE BROWN 



Y. W. C. A. 



) I 



Bess Burgin President 

Jessie Mae Davis Vice President 

Ethel Stinson Undergraduate Rep. 

Evelyn Wilson Secretary 

Ethel Gusman Treasurer 

Virginia Ryman. . .Devotional Chairman 
Erette Reese. . . . 



Mary Elizabeth Fox Devotional 

Hoyt Cates Social Service 

Beverly Harvey Missionary 

Ione Wilson Recreation 

Mary Elizabeth Brown Music 

Johnnie Lee Carlisle Rooms 

Publicity 



The Young Women's Christian Association sponsors a fourfold training for the 
college girl — spiritual, intellectual, physical and social. In stressing this paramount 
feature, all members "unite in creative life through a growing understanding of God." 

Above all, the Y.W.C.A. desires to help every girl who enters Southwestern's 
portals in the following ways: to find and make real friends; to acquire new lines of 
thought; to establish the solid principles of life; to develop self-confidence and self- 
realization by the discovery of individual talents and abilities; and to realize the im- 
portance of putting forth every effort toward the developing of God's greatest gift, 
human personality. 























































JACKSON 

FULLER 



THOMAS 

TRAMMELL 



PYLE 



HUMPHREY 



MUNK 



NELSON 
CLARK 



Y.M.CA. 

B. F. Jackson, Jr President 

Walter Pyle Vice President 

Herndon Nelson Secretary 

Joe Humphrey New Student Chairman 

Jesse Thomas Recreational Chairman 

James Trammell Missionary Chairman 

Carter B. Fuller Boys' Work 

J. Frank Clark Publicity Chairman 

Arthur Munk Social Service Chairman 
















TRAMMELL STINSON BROWN HARVEY MATTHEWS GUSMAN 

BROOKS HO.tGER BENNETT CATES GREENWALDT 



Ep worth League Cabinet 

James F. Trammell President 

George W. Bennett Vice President 

Beverly Harvey Secretary 

Roy Greenwaldt Treasurer 

Ethel Stinson Corresponding Secretary 

Gordon S. Brooks Era Agent 

Rayburn Brown Publicity Chairman 

Kenneth Matthews First Department 

Hoyt Cates Second Department 

Leora Horger Third Department 

Ethel Gusman Fourth Department 















' 

























HARDING BANKS HUMPHREY ALLBRITTEN DICKSON LINDELL 

DAVIDSON BARCUS WILLBERN 

GRAY DANSBY BROWN STOREY MUNK CLEMENTS 





















Pi Kappa Delta 

Buford Banks President 

Joe Humphrey Vice President 

William T. Gray Secretary-Treasurer 

The national organization of Pi Kappa Delta was founded in Southwestern as the 
Alpha Chapter in Texas. It has assumed and maintained a position worthy of the truth 
it signifies, "The art of persuasion, beautiful and just." 

It is the purpose of this organization to stimulate progress in and to promote the 
interests of intercollegiate oratory, debate, and public speaking by encouraging a 
spirit of intercollegiate fellowship, of brotherly co-operation and interest, and by con- 
ferring upon deserving candidates the badge of distinction, proficiency, and honor, 
varied and graduated according to merit and achievement. 













































Allbritten 
Dansby 



Humphrey 
Brown 



Banks 
Storey 



Gray 

MUNK 



Intercollegiate Debaters 



Question: Resolved, That a Jury System of Five or Seven Trained Jurists be Substi- 
tuted for the Present System in Both Civil and Criminal Cases. 

FIRST TRIANGULAR DEBATE 

Southwestern University Texas Christian University Trinity University 

Southwestern Affirmative Team 
Arthur Munk Madison Storey 

Southwestern Negative Team 
Joe Humphrey Rayburn Brown 

SECOND TRIANGULAR DEBATE 
Southwestern University Southern Methodist Univerity Hendrix College 

Southwestern Affirmative Team 
William Gray Buford Banks 

Southwestern Negative Team 
Roland Dansby Leo Allbritten 





















































































GRAY BANKS NOBLE REESE CLEMENTS FULLER 

GROVE EMERSON HARDING BEARD PHILLIPS 

WOOD REED STOREY MARTIN LANGFORD 





















Mask and Wig 




Mask and Wig of Southwestern University has established a very notable record in 
the dramatic field. 

Tke Passing of the Third Floor Back; If I Were King; Told in a Chinese Garden; The Piper; 
Peer Gynt; Macbeth; Judge Lynch; The Rector; The Little Father of the Wilderness; The Goose 
Hangs High; and Lady Windermere's Fan are among the plays of the past. 

This year the Mask and Wig proved themselves worthy of their long standing popu- 
larity and good reputation in The Show-Off. Mr. Harding plans to close the season 
with several one-act plays. 




































MOET PYLE KEITH LANDRUM GUENZEL CLARK 

WISDOM BROWN BRUTON ULLRICH WAPPLE FAITH 

TINSLEY GDDBEY GUTHRIE MOSES 




Science Society 



John Moet President 

Walter Pyle Secretary-Treasurer 

The Chemical Society, from which sprang the Science Society, had as members only 
students of Chemistry, as the name indicated. The Science Society now includes stu- 
dents of Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Mathematics. Candidates must have two 
majors of science, the science in which they are majoring, and be taking another 
major at the time of election. An average of eighty-five, counting the major science 
courses twice, is required of the candidate. 

It is the purpose of the society to take upon itself the work of promulgating pDpular 
knowledge and appreciation of science and its activities. 

Outstanding in the work of the society for this year has been the bringing of Dr. 
H. S.Jennings to Southwestern to lecture on "Eugenics." 













NICHOLS 
MATTHEWS 
BROOKS FULLER 

BENNETT STUDER 



HEACOCK THOMAS MAULDIN MCCORD 

WEIMER TRAMMELL MCDANIEL STONE 

GREENWALDT NANEZ MUNK RICHESON 

COSTON CRAY SCHWEERS MCDANIEL 












Ministerial Association 

Alfred Nichols President 

Bernard McCord Vice President 

Carter B. Fuller Secretary 

The Ministerial Association is an organization composed of the student ministers 
as well as a few others on the campus that are planning to do certain religious work. 
The activities of the association are directed so as to best prepare the members along 
lines of common service for the church and humanity. 

This year the association has been working in cooperation with The Life Service 
Band. Appointments for holding services in and near Georgetown are filled by various 
members. Programs have been conducted at both the Williamson County jail and the 
poor farm by this organization. 




























URGIN 


HODGES 


WILLIAMSON 


BRUTON 


HEACOCK 


GUSMAN 


COOKE 


HUMPHREY 


STOCKLAS 


MARSH 


WEIR 


COCKE 


VINEYARD 


KEITH 


LIESE 




ULLRICH 


DAVIDSON BRUTON 


HOWARD 





Scholarship Society 

Bess Burgin President 



Ci 



Hodges Vice President 



Jewel Williamson Secretary-Treasurer 

The objects of the Scholarship Society are the stimulation, promotion and recogni- 
tion of scholarship and of the elements of character which make scholarship effective 
for good. Any student is eligible for membership in the society who has established 
an average of ninety over a minimum of eighteen majors, or an average of eighty-seven 
over twenty-seven majors of work. Good character and reputation are essential quali- 
fications for entrance. The top or ranking tenth of the junior and senior classes are 
eligible for membership. 

It is the custom of the society to award a dictionary to the freshman attaining the 
highest average in his or her work during the year. A speaker is invited at some time 
during the year to address the student body on some phase of scholarship. 


































































ULLER 


CLARK 


GREENWALDT 


DICKERSON 


BROOKS 


MCCORD 


TRAMMELL 


STINSON 


HORGER 


BENNETT 


HARVEY 


GLASSCOCK 


GROVE 


BRVSON 


FOX 


DOERING 


ADAMS 


STINSON 


GORZYCKI 


GIBBONS 




































San Jacinto Literary Society 

"Perfect eloquence clothes man with kingly poiver." 

Officers for Fall Term 

Carter B. Fuller President 

Bernard McCord Vice President 

Ethel Stinson Recording Secretary 

Gordon Brooks Financial Secretary 




























GRAY 


REGNELL 


SCARBROUGH 


CARLISLE 


RAETZSCH 


JAMES 


BEHRENS 


SECREST 


WEDEMEYER 


SMITH 


KILGORE 


SAATHOFF 


GLASSCOCK 


STONE 


WALKER 


GUTHRIE 


REED 


FOERSTER 


CALDWELL 


PARKS 
















San Jacinto Literary Society 

Winter Term Officers 

Carter B . Fuller President 

J. Frank Clark Vice President 

Ethel Stinson Recording Secretary 

Gordon Brooks Financial Secretary 

Spring Term Officers 

Bernard McCord President 

Doris Dickerson Vice President 

Leora Horger Recording Secretary 

Gordon Brooks Financial Secretary 












..i5iSL». 




























MELBURN 


DOERING 


LIESE 


LEHMBERG 


WILLBERN 


ULLRICH 


MARTIN 


CZAROWITZ 


RAETZSCH 


GROTE 


MOET 


ARONSON 



SAATHOFF KEYSER 

BERGQUIST THOMAS 

GREENWALDT GIBBONS 

FOERSTER BEHRNS 
























®f)e #erman Club 

Felix Melburn President 

Anne Marie Doering Vice President 

Olivia Liese Recording Secretary 

Lester Keyser Corresponding Secretary 

Esther Saathoff Pianist 



















GILLETT 

JOHNS 

LORENZ 



SCHWEERS 



MUNK 




GLASSCOOK 


NANEZ 


SMITH 


GIRVIN 




DAVIS 


BATTE 


THOMAS 


PURL 




TERRY 


QUEBEDEAUX 


LORENZ 




BOMAR 


ERICSON 


ANDERSON 





The German Club was organized this year under the direction of Professor F.C.A. 
Lehmberg. Three professors and thirty-six students were elected members to this club. 

The need of such an organization on Southwestern's campus resulted in the forma- 
tion of the German Club. The purpose is to develop knowledge of German conversa- 
tion and German literature. The regular meetings are to be held every other Tuesday 
night. The requirement for membership for this club is a knowledge of German. 























































S. 0. S. Club 









Eula Mae Scarborough President 

Mary Maude Wedemeyer Vice President 

Lucy Jones Secretary Treasurer 










Snyder Hall is the home of nineteen young women who keep house on the coopera- 
tive plan. Perhaps there is no part of Southwestern University that has achieved such 
rapid progress and success recently. Three years ago Dr. Barcus, president of South- 
western, asked Mrs. Margaret McKennon to take charge of this home for young wom- 
en. Mrs. McKennon assumed the Herculean task by welcoming eight girls at the open- 
ing of school, 1916-1917. The following year there were fifteen girls selected to stay at 
Snyder Hall. Under the direction of Mrs. Wedemeyer, nineteen girls were selected this 
year. This proves the rapid growth of the popularity of the Hall. 

This year they have organized a club among themselves called the S. O. S. — The 
Sisters of Snyder Hall. Under the direction of the S. O. S. Club the various socials and 
dinners are planned. 

These nineteen girls, with their piano, violins, phonographs, picnics, birthday and 
other holiday dinners constitute one of the happiest groups on the campus. They 
maintain one of the highest averages of scholarship of any group of Southwestern. 










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FINE ARTS 


















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CLARKE, MARTINSON, FULLER, EDDINS, BELL, MELBURN, JETT, JOHNS, GREEN 
MALME, FOERSTER, ALLBRITTEN, TRAMMELL, BROOKS, McDANIEL, PARKS 


















Henry Edwin Meyer 
Director 



The Glee Club of Southwestern is a group of 
nineteen carefully selected voices. The club 
this year has been one of the best ever organ- 
ized in Southwestern. The club has been 
directed throughout the season by Dean 
Meyer. 



hiiversity Glee C 

First Tenors 


hw 

Second Tenors 




Harley McDaniel 


Leo Allbritten 




Paul Jett 


Gordon Brooks 




Chester Allen 


Don Johns 




Carter B. Fuller 


Gillette Parks 




Percival Eddins 


Victor Foerster 




Rev. C. Malme 






First Bass 


Second Bass 




Franklin Martinson 


Felix Melburn 




James Trammell 


S. Durrenberger 




Tom Clarke 


J. Ernest Bell 




Oatman Green 






Henry Fox 











ELLIOTT, HARDIN, SAATHOFF, MCWHORTER, GROTE, HARVEY, REGNELL, DAVIS, DAVIS, HORGER, 
THURMOND, BUTLER, MYERS, COERING, DAVIS, STINSON, PORTER 



The Choral Club 



Sopranos 
Ophelia Thurmond 
Claude Porter 
Florence Elliott 
Lillian Gorzycki 
Lucile McWhorter 
Louise Hardin 
Virginia Regnell 



Me%x_o Sopranos 
Esther Saathoff 
Lonie Grote 
Anna Grove 
Beverly Harvey 
Edith Stinson 
Anne M. Doering 
Dorothy Davis 



Altos 
Jane Davis Lucile Myers 

Mary Frances Davis Leora Horger 

Accompanist and Violinist 
Lois Butler 

The Choral Club of Southwestern Uni- 
versity is composed of nineteen girls. This 
club has rendered several very interesting pro- 
grams during the year in Georgetown, besides 
making a trip through North Texas. The trip 
included engagements in Hamilton, Cisco, 
DeLeon and Breckenridge. The Choral Club 
has been directed throughout the season by 
Miss Elizabeth Mills. 




Elizabeth Mills 
Director 
















































Southwestern Band 




RICHARD HEACOCK 



Comets 

Jett 

Myers 

Brooks 

Price 

Asher 

Morris 

Altos 

Burns 
Myers 

Trombone 

Chapman 
Buss 

Bass Horn 
Tyler 



Clarinets 

Murray 

Allamon 

Davis 

Baritones 

Green 
Richardson 

Saxophone 

Wilcox 

Sellers 

Keyser 

Naranjo 

Green 

Bass Drum 
Jett 


















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Little Symphony 




First Violins 
Lonie Grote 
Evelyn Raetzsch 
Emma P. Clement 
Jack Clement 
William Murray 

Second Violins 
Jane Davis 
Dorothy Davis 

Trumpet 
Jimmy Asher 

Trombone 

Eugene Torbett 

Drum 
Jim Jett 



Bass 

H. H. Onstot 

Flute 

Lucile Hodges 

Clarinet 

Richard Heacock 
Edgar Allamon 

Saxophone 

Oatman Green 
Lester Keyser 

Piano 

Mary Elizabeth 
Brown 





Paul Jett, Director 
























DOERING 


BROWN 


MILLS MEVER MELBURN 


COOKE 


DICK.ERSON 


AVERITT 


RAETSZCH JONES SANDERS 


HORGER 


SAATHOFF 


FERRELL 


HUCKABEE HARGROVE REED 


STINSON 


BUTLER 


MACUNE 


MCWHORTER THOMASON SMITH 


GROTE 



The Music Club 

Anne Marie Doering President 

Mary Elizabeth Brown Vice President 

Dora Deane Smith Secretary 

Henry Edwin Meyer Dean of Music 

Elizabeth Mills .... Instructor in Piano and Voice 

"Music develops the finer sense of the soul." 

The Music Club made its appearance upon Southwestern's campus last year as an 
organization to associate the interests and activities of the Fine Arts Students, as 
well as to foster new interest and studies pertaining to the field of music, such as the 
opera, interpretation, current events and biographical sketches about prominent and 
professional people connected with music. The meetings of the Club are largely given 
over to recitals participated in by the members. Thus the regularly appointed recitals 
have been to a degree replaced by the new combination recitals at the meetings. 









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FRATERNITIES 





















Kappa Alpha 



Founded 1865, Washington and Lee University 

Xi Installed 1883 

Colors: Crimson and Gold Flowers: Magnolia and Red Rose 





















John Gillett 



Fratres in Urbe 



Alumnus Advisor 
John Gillett 

Faculty Advisor 

R. W. TlNSLEY 



D. K. Porter 





















Lewis Warinner 
Riley Marshall 
Kennard Thomas 
Kelly Lawrence 
Don Johns 



Fratres in Universitate 

Lee Foster 
Edwin Mikulik 
Marion L. Hodges 
Gordon Barr 
Lloyd Johns 
Andy Andrews 



























Homer Earl King 
H. W. Cortes 
Willis Davis 
Chester Allen 
William Mennis 



Pledges 










Robert Jancik 
Rhea Anderson 
James Harris 
Cecil Pennington 
Glenn Terry 


















»/r } 
































Marshall Lawrence Warinner 

Hodges Mikulik 

Lloyd Johns Andrews Barr 

Harris Jancik Davis 

Allen Anderson Mennis 



Foster Thomas 

Don Johns 
King 
Cortes 
Pennington 



















Kappa Sigma 






Color: 



Founded 1869, University of Virginia 
Iota Installed 1S86 
Scarlet, White and Emerald Green Flower: Lily of the Valley 



























Fratres in Urbe 
M. F. Smith M. F. Hodges 

Alumnus Advisor 
M. F. Smith 

Frater in Facilitate 
Robert Venable Brown 

Facility Advisor 
Robert Venable Brown 















fi 


















Fratres in Universitate 



William Dickson 
William Gillett 
William P. Clark 
J. F. McCrabb 



Weldon Williams 
Duncan Whiteside 
William Branch 






Pledge 



W. Maner Stafford 
William B. Barrett 
Wesley Blackburn 
Stoner Daniel 



M. U. Borden 
Martin Blackburn 
Monroe Smith 



Bob Kercheville 






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Cr 






Dickson 
Daniel 

Gillett 
McCrabb 

Kercheville 
Blackburn 



Barrett 
Whiteside 



Blackburn 

Stafford 
Clark 

Williams 
Branch 

Borden 



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Phi Delta Theta 



Founded 1848, Miami University 



Texas Gamma Installed 1886 



Colors: Argent and Azure Flower: White Carnation 



D. W. Wilcox Sam Stone 

D. K. Wilcox E. T. Cooper 

R. L. Logan Walter Young 

Bond Chreitzberg 



Paul Patterson Young 



Fratres in Universitate 
Manning Clements Leroy Buss 



Pledges 






- 
Fratres in Urbe 






Fratres in Facilitate 
Wesley Carroll Vaden Herbert Lee Gray 



i 

Faculty Advisor 
Paul Patterson Young 



Tames Burleson Clifford Allen 

J. Ernest Bell Thomas Newberry 

Tom Fowler T. C. Sharp, Jr. 

Shelton Gafford Ernest L. Kurth, Jr. 

Fred Young Leigh Andrews 



Charlie Tunnell P. G. Secrest, Jr. 

Ernest Morris Henry Fox 

Cecil Childre Joe Luna 

Wilburn Oatman, Jr. Harvey Burke 

Allister Waldrop, Jr. Ellis Power 







Allen 
Fowler Bell 

Gafford Andrews 

Waldrop Power 

Secrest Burke 



Clements Burleson 

Kurth Young 

Buss Newberry Sharp 

Fox Tunnell Childre 

Luna Morris Oatman 









































Pi Kappa Alpha 



Founded at the University of Virginia, May, i, 1868 

Alpha Omicron Chapter Established Nov. n, 1910 

Colors: Garnet and Old Gold Flower: Lily of the Valley 

Frater in Facilitate 
C. M. Edens 



Franklin Price 



John Moet 
W. A. Shofner 

Vance Seamans 
Edwin Franklin 



Fratres in Urbe 



W. L. Armstrong 



Fratres in Universitate 

Robert Safley 
F. A. Mood 
W. I. Stevenson 
George Keene 
Marvin Landrum 















George Smith 
C. H. Bradley 
Howard Bomar 
Elgin Cook 
Frank Driskill 
Lewis McCauley 



Fledges 



CD. Fulkes 
Roy Jeter 
Harry Hodges 
Michael Stafford 
Lawson Rivers 
Phillip Murray 



Mattison L. Storey 

















Moet Keene 

Safley 
Seamans Shofner 

Cook Smith 

Bradley McCauley 

Driskill Jeter 



Stevenson 

Franklin 
Hodges 

Bomar 



Fulkes 
Rivers 



Mood 

Landrum 

Stafford 

























) - 









































■ 












CLEMENTS 
FOWLER 



WARINNER 
MARSHALL 



DICKSON 
GILLETT 



MOET 

KEENE 




The Pan-Hellenic Council of Southwestern University is composed of two repre- 
sentatives from each of the four fraternities, Phi Delta Theta, Kappa Alpha, Kappa 
Sigma and Pi Kappa Alpha. Regular meetings are held the first Monday of each month 
and call meetings are held at the request of members. 

The purpcse cf this council is tc er courage a better understanding between the fra- 
ternities, to govern fraternities in regard to rushing, pledging and initiating, to settle 
all disputes and difficulties that may arise between the fraternities, thereby maintain- 
ing a spirit of cooperation and harmony. 

Pan-Hellenic sponsored, as in previous years, the inter-fraternity smoker that was 
given in the winter term. Each year a schedule is arranged for baseball, basketball, 
tennis and golf. Rules regarding eligibility are passed by this body and dates are fixed 
for the occurrence of events. 
















































SORORITIES 




























Phi Mu 

Founded 1851, Macon, Ga. 
Xi Kappa Installed 1906 






Colors: Old Rose and White 



Flower: Enchantress Carnation 


















Mrs. Lee Hall 
Mrs. G. C. Hester 
Mrs. Joe McInnis 
Mrs. S. T. Atkin 



Patro 



Mrs. F. D. Love 
Mrs. M. L. Williams 
Mrs. Stiles Byrom 
Mrs. B. Stansell 



Sorores in Urbe 



Miss Frances Love 
Mrs. Hobson Martin 
Miss Mary Lee Stewart 



Mrs. Herman Sullivan 
Mrs. R. M. Nall 
Miss Mildred Stansell 



Sorores in Universitate 



Marie Berger 
Ena Mae Cooke 

JuANITA BuLLER 

Elizabeth Klein 



Lois Williams 
Margaret Hotchkiss 
Jewell Williamson 
Janie Kirkwood 


















Annie Beth Thomason 
Edwina Chrietzberg 
Nelle Jewel Harris 
Jonnie Ross 



Pledge 



Vesta Garry 
Lucinda Mae Isaacs 
Mabel D. Nall 
Ruby Lee Dickerson 



Effie Opal Bryson 












V 




Williams 

Hotchkiss 
Berger 
Bryson 

Garry 
Isaacs 



Klein 



Chreitzberg 



Harris 



Thomason 

Nall 







































Zeta Tau Alpha 



Founded 1898, Farmersville, Va. 
Lambda Installed 1906 
Colors: Turquoise Blue and Steel Gray 



Flower: White Violet 



Mrs. C. S. Griffith 
Mrs. W. H. Moses 
Mrs. D. W. Wilcox 
Mrs. R. A. Nichols 



Patronesses 

Mrs. R.J. Stone 
Mrs. E. G. Gillett 
Mrs. E. L. Hardin 
Mrs. W. J. Burcham 
Mrs. D. K. Porter 















Sore 



Urbe 



Mrs. J. H. McGinnis Mrs. Lawrence Starnes 

Miss Lorena Moses 






Sorores in Facilitate 
Miss Annie Edward Barcus 



Sorores in Universitate 









Tula Lee Stone 
Frances Stone 
Marie Moses 
Mary Sue Burcham 
Aleen Hardin 
Gladys Ewing 
Eunice O'Hara 
Martha Wallace 



Jenny Davis 
Catherine Pettus 
Hazel Deffebach 
Lulu Young 



Jean Smith 




Lillian Blanche Thompson 




Marjorie Bryan 




Ruth Dayvault 




La Verne Stirling Vineyard 
Elizabeth Dozier 




Claire Hodges 




Claude Porter 





Wanda Smith 



Pledges 



Louise Hardin 
Elizabeth Reed 
Maybelle Martin 
Miriam Loewenstein 






Elizabeth Dayvault 








































EwiNG 

Stone 
Hardin 
Dayvault 
Martin 



Smith Hodges 

Dozier 

Thompson 
Moses Stone 

Davis Bryan 

Reed Pettus 



Vineyard 
Smith 
Wallace 

Dayvault 
Deffebach 
Young 



Porter 

O'Hara 

Burcham 

loewenstein 

Hardin 


































• 










Alpha Delta Pi 

Founded 1851, Macon, Ga. 
Zeta Installed 1907 



Colors: Blue and White 



Flower: Violet 


















Mrs. H. N. Graves 
Mrs. Marvin Hodges 
Mrs. W. L. Price 
Mrs. Claud Howard 
Mrs. Harry Dolan 



Patronesses 



Mrs. D. K. Wilcox 
Mrs. Eldridge Hodges 
Mrs. H. T. McCollum 
Miss Velma Tisdale 
Miss Levita Tisdale 



S or ores in Urbe 



Mrs. Llewellyn Duke 
Mrs. Roy Richardson 
Mrs. Emmett Cook 
Mrs. Henry Price 
Mrs. E. Flanagan 
Mrs. W. A. Quebedeaux 



Mrs. Walter Young 
Mrs. John Gillett 
Miss Johnnie Wright 
Miss Elizabeth Hodges 
Miss Agnes Wilcox 
Miss Molly Davis 



Miss Imogene Sutton 



) ~ 









Sorores in Universitate 












n 







Tennessee Spencer 
Lila Martin 
Cleo Smith 
Florence Lovell 
Mary Ellen Young 



Nancy de Bruin 
Lucille Smith 
Margaret Abney 
Dorothy Cavitt 
Clovis Cox 
Imogene Beard 
Ruth Wilcox 



Fledges 



Jessie May Davis 
Elizabeth Tarver 
Martha Cottingham 
Jack Clement 
Emma Pearl Clement 



Marion Holmes 

Madge Cooper Quebedeaux 

Lucille Hodges 

Aubra Anderson 

Marion Urban 

Mary Kuhn Browning 

Lois Thornton 
















Smith Spencer Young Martin 

Tarver Lovell 

J. Clement E. P. Clement Cottingham Davis 

Anderson Cavitt Browning Beard Thornton 

DeBruin Cox Urban Smith 

Abney Quebedeaux Wilcox Hodges Holmes 



1 


















Delta Delta Delta 


















Founded 1888, Boston, Mass. 
Theta Epsilon Installed 191 1 
Colors: Silver, Gold and Blue 



Patronesses 



Flower: Pansv 



Mrs. R. W. Tinsley 
Mrs. Geo. N. McDaniel 
Mrs. Ed Moore 



Mrs. S. J. Enochs 
Mrs. A. A. Hufstutler 
Mrs. Eugene Torbett 





















Sorores in Urbe 
Miss Bernice Hufstutler Mrs. R. L. Logan 

Sorores in Facilitate 

Miss Laura Kuykendall Miss Rowena Onderdonk 

Miss D'Laurel Beville 



Sorores in Umversitate 





















Clyde Baskin 
Bess Burgin 
Emily Gervis Enochs 
Gladys Noble 
Marylee Payne 
Elizabeth Pope 



Beverly Harvey 
Odessa Johnson 
Anne Marie Djering 
Mary Elizabeth Fox 
Virginia Ryman 
Florine Stocklas 



ELIZABETH 



Gree 



Mary Frances Bowers 
Julia Hyman 
Helen Phillips 
Annie Mae Read 
Kathryn Baggett 
Lena Belle Baskin 



Pledges 

Mary Belle Batte 
Dorothy Denson 
Harriett Flinn 
Marguerite Meekins 
Evelyn Raetzchs 
Ophelia Thurmond 
Lucy Martin 













































£S 




Noi 



Foj 



C. Baskin Payne Enochs 

Pope Ryman 

Stocklas Harvey Johnson Burgin 

Doering Green Baggett Phillips Hyman 

Bowers Flinn Reed L. B. Baskin Denson 

Meekins Batte Raetzsch Thurmond Martin 

































~»-fc-« 




















































EWING 

o'hara 



NOBLE 
POPE 



SMITH 

CLEMENT 



COOKE 
BERGER 


















The Woman's Pan-Hellenic Council of Southwestern University is composed of two 
representatives of each of the four sororities, Zeta Tau Alpha, Delta Delta Delta, 
Alpha Delta Pi and Phi Mu. It has charge of all matters of an inter-sorority in- 
terest. The purpose of this council is to encourage a better understanding between the 
sororities and to govern the sororities in regard to rushing activities, qualifications 
of pledges and social functions. 

The council sponsored the annual All-University tea, the purpose- of the tea being 
to give the students a chance to know each other better. 


























'/ saw halting near me a troop of runners and 
at their head a youth royally arrayed. 













To one who is loyal to athletics at South- 
western University, who has a pleasing person- 
ality, who is well loved by all, and who has 
demonstrated his ability as a coach by winning 
two championships in football, two champion- 
ships in basketball and two championships in 
baseball: To Coach "Lefty" Edens, we the 
twenty-fourth editorial staff of the Sou'wester, 
dedicate this section. 






















































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"S" Association 

The "S" Association is an organization composed of all who earn the official "S." 
It is the purpose of the association to sponsor advancement in athletics and to aid the 
intramural council in promoting class games. The association plans to begin imme- 
diately on a campaign for a new stadium and gymnasium. 

One of the outstanding social events on the calendar is the annual "S" banquet. 
This banquet proved a huge success this year, and it will be long remembered by all 
who attended. 




Ed Franklin, (left) stu- 
dent manager of athletics. 



Unk" Young (right') 
president of "S" Associa- 
tion. 









































MOCK, WILLIAMS, BRANCH, RIVERS, McCAULEY, CORTES, GATES, HARRIS, WILSON 

KLEIN, YOUNG, GAYLE, PORTER, WILCOX, MARTIN, FLANNIGAN 

OATMAN ALLBRITTEN 






;H 









Pep Squad 

The Pep Squad consists of twenty students appointed by a committee composed of 
the two yell leaders and the president of the Students' Association. They are the 
backbone of the Pirate Pep. 









€3 




Leaders of Pirate Pep 

Wilburn Oatman, Jr., (Jeff) 
and Leo Allbritten (rigbf) 




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The Athletic Council is composed of three faculty members, the head coach and one 
student representative. The function of this council is to control and supervise the 
athletic relations of Southwestern. 

The Season 

Southwestern was handicapped from the start in her football contests. The first 
week of practice brought three broken ribs to Captain Blackburn and an injured ankle 
to Andy Andrews. This crippled both back field and line, and the Pirates seemed never 
to completely throw off the jinx. The outstanding victory of the season was the second 
consecutive win over the Rice Owls. The best game was the losing contest with 
Howard Payne that closed the season. 

Coach Edens began his basketball season with four lettermen. Reserve strength was 
weak, but through hard work a well rounded five walked on the court for the Canary 
and Black. The Pirates took the first three conference games and then dropped one to 
Simmons. This game broke the morale of the Corsairs and they dropped another to 
Simmons and one to Austin College. The Pirates finished second in the championship 
race. 

Track prospects are extraordinarily good this year. Coach Edens is devoting his full 
time to the cinder path since the athletic council abolished baseball. With Captain 
Young on the hurdles and javelin, Alton Smith on the weights, Gates and Newton, 
high jump, Brannen, dashes and a host of freshmen taking care of the short and long 
distances, there is no reason why the Pirates should not make a fine showing this year. 
Southwestern entertains the Texas Conference meet for 192.9, and this promises to be 
one of the fastest meets in its history. 





































FOOTBALL 


































Captain 

WESLEY BLACKBURN 



The Season 

Led by Captain Wesley Blackburn, four-letter 
man and also four-year letterman in football, South- 
western's Pirates made a strong bid for Texas Con- 
ference honors. Inopportune injuries and an ill- 
arranged schedule worked against the team, and the 
hopes of championship were lost. 

The dregs of defeat however were covered with 
the nectar of victory when the All-Conference se- 
lections were announced. Robert Lee Jancik, the 
elusive broken field runner, was the unanimous 
choice at the quarterback position. Jancik proved 
himself an excellent field general many times. He 
has yet to be downed by only one tackier. 

"Hog" Hodges was placed at tackle for the 
second year. There are few football players that can 
boast "Hog's" combined nerve and ability. He 
fights to stay on top and when down, fights to get 
back up. He is undoubtedly the best tackle the con- 
ference has known in several seasons. 

"Unk" Young, the one and only "Unk," was an- 
other of the Pirates on the mythical eleven. As a 
passer and punter "Unk" has no peer and in the 
broken field his equals are few. 















■ 



- i 



1 












Hodges 

Tackle 



Blackburn 

Half 



Andrews 
Center 



A 6> M 21 — Southwestern o 

Opening the season of 19x8 with the powerful Texas A&M Aggies, our 1917 Texas 
Conference Champions waged a hard-fought battle, but emerged from the fray with 
the score of 2.1-0 against them. The Pirates kept the farmers guessing throughout the 
first half with their dazzling aerial attack. The ball was kept in the opponent's terri- 
tory most of the time. The second half started with many substitutions, and it was 
virtually the Aggie reserves against the Pirate reserves. As the Farmers had more re- 
serve strength, they were able to score three touchdowns in the third quarter. 



A 







%S 



Ed goes down and tackles A & M man on -punt. 



•/"V I 




































Brannen 
Half 



Young 
Half 



Miners 7 — Southwestern 33 



Smith 
Full 



The Pirates journeyed to El Paso for the next game, expecting a hard fight with the 
El Paso School of Mines eleven. The game was somewhat a disappointment as the 
Pirates romped away with a 33-7 victory, scoring almost at will. Our second team 
played the second half and made a very creditable showing. The El Paso fans com- 
mended the Pirates highly on their football ability and sportsmanship. 



















jc fa i^n f P 




Brannen and Smith stop Burgess of A & M 
















Jancik 
Quarter 



Johns 
Full 



Allen 
Quarter 















■ 



St. Edwards 12 — Southwestern 6 

Statistics on this game show the Pirates a three-touchdown better team than their 
opponent, but the score book shows a different story. The Pirates outfought, outran, 
outkicked, and did everything but outpoint the St. Ed's team, which was quick to take 
advantage of every break in the game. Drive after drive, and a total of 16 first downs 
carried the Corsairs within the enemy's five-yard line several times, but fumbles pre- 
vented their scoring. Jansing the giant fullback, was the chief factor in the Saint's 
victory, making five of their nine first downs. 








Southwestern makes 8 yards around Saints' right end. 














































Williams 
End 





Johns 

Center 



Franklin 
End 



Austin College 6 — Southwestern 26 

Determined to atone for the defeat at the hands of the Saints, the Buccaneers met 
the team from Austin College and succeeded in proving their power on the gridiron by 
overwhelming the Kangaroos 16-6. The second team started the game and held the 
Kangaroos at bay. The first team came to their relief and found it easy to score. Jancik, 
Young, Brannen, and Blackburn were offensive stars, while Franklin, L. Andrews, 
and Hodges were immovable in the line. 


































Jancik makes 15 yards around kangaroos' right end. 



[I 




















Andrews 
Guard 



Jackson 

Tackle 



Safley 
Guard 






Rice 6 — Southwestern 14 

Fans down in Houston were clamoring for a victory. The Rice Owls were out for 
blood. They came near having their wishes gratified in the first half of the game, and 
kept the Pirates with their backs to the wall fighting desperately to hold the Owls in 
check. The first half ended with the Owls leading 6-0, but in the last half, it was a 
different story. The Pirate passing machine scored two touchdowns before the last 
half was well under way, while our defense kept the Houstonians in their own terri- 
tory. 



» * 4 







Southwestern prepares to pass over Kangaroos' line. 







& 



«'/ 

































FuLKES 

End 



Mercer 

Tackle 



Smith 
Full 



Simmons 14 — Southwestern 7 

The Pirates with only three days of rest after their victory over Rice met the Sim- 
mon's Cowboys, who were doped to be the underdogs. The Pirates easily outplayed 
their opponents in the first half. A pass from Blackburn to Brannen scored our only 
touchdown, but two seconds before the half was up, the Cowboys slipped over a 
touchdown that made it 7 all. Frequent passes and delays caused the last quarter of the 
game to be played in semi-darkness. It was this time that the Simmons team scored the 
winning marker in spite of our stubborn defense. 




Pirates gain 12 yards around Cowboys' right end. 





































Johnson 
Guard 



DuPuy 

Center 



Seamans 
Half 



San Marcos Teachers 7 — Southwestern 12 

The Pirates celebrated Armistice Day by downing the Bobcats 12.-7. The felines were 
fortunate in keeping the powerful aerial attack from resulting in a heavier score, but 
the score does not give a true summary of the Pirates' offense. Jancik scored both 
touchdowns. Hodges was a tower of defense in the line. The Bobcats could push over 
only six first downs against the Pirates' twenty-one. 






















Blackie hits Teachers' line for a big gain. 


































Aiken 
Guard 




Woods 

Tackle 












Trinity 6 — Southwestern ig 

Pirate fight had not entirely left the Buccaneers when they met the Trinity Tigers in 
Waxahachie after the disheartening Simmons game. Vainly the Bengals tried to 
avenge the drubbing they received at the hands of the Pirates last year, but brilliant 
runs by Blackburn and Jancik, and passes from Young to Brannen showed them that 
they must wait still another year for a chance to defeat the powerful Pirate machine. 































Brannen makes a long run through the San Marcos line. 










BASKETBALL 















































The Pirates finished second in the Texas Conference this year with a percentage of .joo in the 
ten games played with conference teams. 



Basketball Results 







Jan. 


7- 


-S.U. 


M 


A & M 39 


Jan. 


8- 


-S.U. 


x 5 


A & M 33 


Jan. 


14- 


-S.U. 


16 


S.W.T.S.T.C. 15 


Jan. 


19- 


-S.U. 


40 


Howard Payne 30 


Jan. 


11- 


-S.U. 


2.8 


Simmons 35 


Jan. 


16- 


-S.U. 


33 


St. Edwards 27 


Jan. 


xS- 


-S.U. 


39 


St. Edwards 31 


Feb. 


4" 


-S.U. 


2-5 


A & M 19 


Feb. 


5" 


-S.U. 


16 


A & M 45 


Feb. 


r 


-S.U. 


35 


Trinity 18 


Feb. 


11— 


-S.U. 


z8 


Austin 32. 


Feb. 


16- 


-S.U. 


17 


Simmons 42. 


Feb. 


18- 


-S.U. 


4 1 


Howard Payne 17 


Feb. 


2.0- 


-S.U. 


10 


S.W.T.S.T.C. 2.3 


Feb. 


2-3- 


-S.U. 


35 


Trinity 15 


Feb. 


2-5- 


-S.U. 


53 


Austin 13 






I I 



Captain "sue" brannen 












I\ N 



(ft 









Whittle, Center 



' 'Slim' ' always gets the tip-off. He was high point man of the Texas Conference and 
was picked as center on the mythical team in the Texas Conference. 



Mikulik, Forward 

"Mik" has served as a forward on the Pirate quintet for four years. His shoes will be 
hard to fill next season. 

Safley, Guard 

In the thick of every fray, we are sure to find Bob. He is a hard fighter and a good 
one. 










(frit 



4> $**$*&' ~l 







} ~ s. 






^ 



























Franklin, Guard 

Ed is a good floor man and is always in every play. His man seldom gets a chance to 
score. 

Seamans, Forward 

Vance is a fast and righting little forward. He should develop into one of the out- 
standing forwards on the team next year. 






G. Smith, Forward 

George is fast and is a good goal shooter. This man was among the first ten leading 
scorers of the conference. 

































Williams, Forward 

"Hess" is a valuable man because of his "never die" spirit. He is always in there 
giving his best. 

A. Smith, Guard 
Alton is our old reliable, always willing to do what he can. He is a real hustler. 



Newton, Center 

He has a good eye for the basket and should prove himself a very valuable man on 
the team next year. 



■ 



















-»~*? R i «.».>» % 



/^ 


































"Slim," "M/k," Bob and " Sue" were the four old lettermen from 

the preceding season. 





"Sue" was the best defensive man in the conference and was always hustling. He was -picked 
as guard on the mythical team in the Texas Conference. 



















mi 



















TRACK 










































ft 











msm. 




Captain "Unk" Young 

Discus, high and loiv 

hurdles, javelin 



"Captain" Rodney Kidd 
Coach of the Pirate Track 
Team; Ex- Pi rate Star and 
now Principal of Georgetown 
High School. 



Alton Smith 
Discus, shot, javelin 



Track Season 

The track season of 192.8 was not a very successful one for Southwestern. With a 
squad composed almost entirely of first year men, Coach Kidd entered the Pirates in 
three meets. Although Southwestern did not win a meet, the team always finished 
fighting. 

Young and Smith were the outstanding performers. These men represented the 
Canary and Black at the conference meet at Brownwood. Young won second place in 
the high hurdles, while Smith won points in the shot put and discus throw. 

The prospects are bright for the season of 1919. There are enough seasoned men to 
carry the Pirates through the hardest events, and Southwestern is due to make a good 
showing at the meet in Georgetown. 

















" 






. 









) - 





my 



g 
1 















Wesley Blackburn Relay; 100-yard dash; 220-yard dash 

Herschel Brannen 100-yard dash; 220-yard dash 

Robert Safley Half-mile; 440-yard dash 






1 




Jesse Thomas Relay; one-mile 

Clifton Epps Half-mile; one-mile 

Dave Gates High jump; relay. 































































































, 



r 





o 



*£t- i 





Curtis Cowart Low hurdles 



Robert Sipes Pole vault 



William Thompson Half-mile, one-mile and two-mile 




"Unk" and Alton warm up 









■ 






























v?*H 




BASEBALL 











































yi>V ,;--.>.-^^ 









The 1918 Pirate nine won their second straight unofficial conference championship 
in baseball. 

The Pirates played seventeen games, winning eight and losing nine. There were 
eight conference games played: six won and two lost, making a percentage of .750. 

The outstanding feature of the season was the terrific hitting of the Pirates, led by 
John Rountree who had a percentage of .409. Ballew and Andrews gave Rountree a 
close race for the batting honors. 






























fUT£$V f^ T % 



Captain Harvey Ballew, Third Base 
Captain-Elect Edwin Mikulik, Second Base 



Two-year letter man 
Three-year letter man 



















|R4T£S, 



Clyde Whittle, Pitcher 
Wesley Blackburn, Pitcher 
Andy Andrews, Catcher 




'Sdtts 




BlRATESj 



One-year letter man 
One-year letter man 
One-year letter man 























Claud Hallmark, Catcher 
John Rountree, First Base 
Kelly Lawerence, Shortstop 



Two-year letter man 
Four-year letter man 
Two-year letter man 





































































William Clark, Left Field 
Herschel Brannen, Right Field 
Joe Allen, Center Field 



One-year letter man 
One-year letter man 
Four-year letter man 



RESULTS OF GAMES 



March 31- 

April 4- 

April 11- 

April ix- 

April 16- 

April 17- 

April 13- 

April 2.5- 

April 2.7- 

May 1- 
May 
May 
May 
May 

May u- 

May 14- 

May 15- 



7" 
8- 

10- 

1 1 



-Southwestern 
-Southwestern 
-Southwestern 
-Southwestern 
-Southwestern 
-Southwestern n 
-Southwestern 1 
-Southwestern 19 
-Southwestern 13 
-Southwestern 10 
Southwestern 9 
-Southwestern 10 
-Southwestern o 
-Southwestern 1 
-Southwestern 1 
-Southwestern 4 
-Southwestern o 



Texas University 4 
St. Edwards 8 
Lubbock Tech 2. 
Lubbock Tech 11 
Howard Payne 4 
Howard Payne 7 
San Marcos Teachers 6 
San Marcos Teachers 13 
St. Edwards 4 
San Marcos Teachers 5 
Howard Payne 8 
Howard Payne 9 
San Marcos Teachers 9 
Texas Aggies 5 
Texas Aggies u 
St. Edwards o 
St. Edwards 12. 



















) ■ 



I . \ 







TENNIS 



















r ~lmM? 



;::' 




ismrffw 



«? | ^i 


















TAc Pirate netters, Brown and Robinson, won the doubles championship in the 
Texas Conference for the second consecutive year. 




Captain ray brown 



Tennis Results 

S.U. 6 — Trinity o 

S.U. 2. — Simmons 4 

S.U. 3 — Howard Payne o 

S.U. z — Simmons 4 

S.U. 6 — San Marcos Teachers o 

S.U. 2. — Howard Payne 1 

S.U. 3 — San Marcos Teachers 3 

S.U. 3 — St. Edwards o 




RODGER ROBINSON 













'As soon as they arrived within the buildings 
they began to jeer at him. 



OUJOK 








To You 

0SEEE35& 




(paste your picture here) 



is this humor section of the 192.9 Sou'wester 

dedicated because there has been nothing like it since the dawn of history. If you can- 
not appreciate this particular sort of humor; if you do not know a real joke when you 
see one, then you cannot claim this dedication. 

We give no warranty, expressed or implied, that any of the stories, pictures, jokes, 
write-ups herein contained are representative of truth, justice, literacy, authenticity, 
humor, wit, morbidity, or anything else, good or bad. Nor do we guarantee lawffs, 
larfs, laffs, snickers, grins, or guffaws from the reading of any or all of them. Our only 
pledge is that they are representative of that abstract quantity, "College Wit," as it 
is in its pure, unadulterated and (sometimes almost raw) state. 

Signed: The Sou' Joker 

P.S. But cutting out this sob stuff, which you dumb egos do not seem to get the 
drift of, we will present something which may arouse your weak brains and thus tear 
that graveyard grin from your profiles. 































































W^7 

































The Hole in One 

You have heard of it, I am sure. If you have been on Southwestern's campus this 
year, you could not help it. Of course I am talking of Claudio's hole in one, which has 
given him a new line of bull to sling. The first time that I heard this 'fish story' it 
sounded pretty good, but the hundredth time it got to be pretty old. Quoting as near 
as memory will allow, Claudio's own words, the story runs something like this: 

"Ah, Yes, I did make a hole in one. Heh ! Heh ! We were playing hole on number seven. 
It was a hundred-and-twenty-yard hole, so I chose a mashie for my club. After placing 
my tors at a forty-four-and-six-tenths-degree angle and adjusting my right trouser leg, 
I gave a mighty swing. My ball came down and wedged itself between the side of the 
cup and the flag pole. It was indeed some thrill. I sure had a laugh on Hester, David- 
son, and Porter, who happened to be the other members of the foursome. I truly con- 
sider this to be the climax of my golf career." 

Day after day passed, and still this notable event was talked about. Everyone that 
the Doc would meet would make some remark to him about the Bobby Jones special 
which he had accomplished. His courses were changed from English to Modern Golf 
and Its Methods. But the patience of an educated man (excuse me for bragging on him) 
can at last become exhausted, so the noted author of that unintelligible book on Cole- 
ridge's Idealism was heard to mutter these words: "It is more famous to make a hole 
in one, around this campus, than to be listed in 'Who's Who in America.' 

But why not? This is an age of sports. We recommend the following Bull-item: 
Come to Stouthwestern University with a faculty below par. 
Where men are athletes and women are golf enthusiasts. 
Under the able direction of Dr. CI audio Howard, B.V.D. 



H 



















T)\SW0N0HA8LE MENTION: HPiMm-AN b — "biNG- Dorve-" B£LL — 
TH£ KEese Paws — HOCr-HoD^es — PorothV MiU£/?- 
B/ii C-ziETTE — EMILY AlcalA * . 

0>*«e* &»*<>' Omittod. fixtures of those fr, HONORABLE IMtMTiM S.,«»e ***y 
u-ovli consiiefi-t a-<-, honor t" he re their P'' t ^ r ^s on this page. 



























> - 



I 






! !a N i 














jfcfi. 




We Wonder Why 



—The Tri-Deltas closed their pledge meeting with the Lord's prayer instead of 
singing the Varsity Drag. 

— Paul Davidson always leads the Christmas carol service when he cannot carry a 
tune, much less sing. 

—Miss Kuykendall makes such long speeches in the dining hall. 

— Allbritten has no use for Snyder Hall. 

"Tomcat" Sharp held out all the votes that were not for "Andy" Andrews in the 
Mood Hall Honor Council election. 

— The Kappa Sigs have increased their church attendance. 

— Penny Mood and Bill Minnis have been rushing Clorine Crawford. 

— The Zetas aren't rating as many pins as they did last year. 

— Miriam Loewenstein and Dorothy Cavitt don't learn to walk properly. 

— Kuyk closed down the east wing of the Woman's Building. 

— Bunny Cook thinks he is Mr. Clara Bow. 

—Where, and how Ophelia Thurman got her "White Outfit." 

— Leo Allbritten, Pinky Gates, and Rayburn Brown went to the Valley after the 
election of publication officers last February. 
































t r 




t r 



! 



PROF. G-ODBEY As HE 
APPEARED WHEN HE 
SANG *WffiD-HE4RTED" 

FROM THE OPERA 

'HANNAH;' WHILE AT 

LIEPZIG 



DR. DLLR/CH^ FIRST 
STUDIO PICTURE. MADf 
WHILE HE" WAS ONLY 
A FRESHMAN. HET WAS 

JV%T PLAIN *OSCAft" 
THEN. 




M.L. WIULIAHS, WHOSE 
UNTIRING SEARCH FOR 
•PERSONAL INCIDENTS" 
HADE HltA THE PRIT>E 
OF OE NA VI LLE. PHOTO 
TAKEW WHEW HE WAS 2.fc. 



JU3BTCE 



c 



PROF. DAVIDSON AT THE 
TENDER AG-E OF SIX. 
CONSIDERED A PRODIGY 
BY HIS PARENTS. BY THE 
NEIGHBORS AS*THE KID 
UP THE: STREET* 

F ^ 



6. CHESTER AS AN 
APPLICANT FOR A JOB 
IN THE CONSULAR SERVICE. 
THEORIG-'NAL OF THIS 
PHOTO IS LISTED AS 
ROGUE'S GALLERY 03b?9. 



PROE F.C.A.LEHM6ERG- 

WHEN HE HAULED 
COTTON INTO DEAR OLD 
FREDERICKSBURG, jy WAS 
HOT FRENCH THAT HE 
YELLED AT THE t^ULE S 



































































CW>£zr £^§\ i &eS> (gig *cJL 




ft/// #/" Infamy 

By virtue of his general gooiiness of ap- 
pearance, his handshake, and his readiness 
to take issue on any moral question, we 
give Arthur Munk a place in the sun. His 
habit of grabbing your hand and jerking 
your feet off of the floor in one of the most 
ungodly handshakes has caused everyone 
who passes him to have his hands busily 
occupied. Munk-ey's arguments on the 
different religious views make Bryan's ora- 
tions against Darwin's theory seem like an 
antiquated copy of College Humor. 






"Andy" Andrews, the boy who could 
be a great public speaker if he would only 
practice talking more in actual life. But may God shield and deliver me from the fangs 
of the arch-fiend. If that "Big Andy" bulled any more than he does, it would be more 
monotonous than it is any way. In his day he has known more famous people and 
been to more places and done more things, to hear him tell it, than anyone that has 
has ever passed this way. So give him a place in this hall of ill fame. 

Bernard McCord also deserves a place in this section of Good-For-Nothings. His 
qualifications are: brutishness exhibited in athletic contests and his eternal vamping of 
the women. "Brute" McCord, as his opponents have dubbed him, is an ardent star on 
one of the Mood Hall football teams, being valuable material as a water boy. And 
does he rush the ladies? And how!!! Snyder Hall is his weakness, and the Woman's 
Building is his downfall. If this goes on long he can say with the British Empire, 
"The sun never sets on my possessions." 

"Mama's Boy" Dansby has all the credits necessary, so here he goes into this list of 
immorals. For some reason "Jumbo" has developed a dislike to the members of the 
Mood Hall Honor Council. Wonder what could have riled the temper of this peace- 
loving individual? "Jum" proved to be more than a star in intramural football. He 
was a comet. When his two hundred and sixty-seven pounds and ten ounces stretched 
out on the line, it took in three players of the opposition. "Jumbo's" motto is: "Pure 
milk for bigger and better babies." And he's the proof. 

Let us pause here long enough to pay final respects to "Wild Bill" Gray, the pride 
of Waco. He can imitate anything from Shakespeare to a disreputable character from 
the Whiz Bang. He is especially gifted at throwing an epileptic fit. "Bilious Bull" 
compels the freshmen to get out in the hall and holler, "What the world needs is more 
men like Bill Gray." All freshmen who have done this hold up your hands. Bill makes 
attempts at singing and when he quits "The Song is Ended, But There Never Was 
Any Melody." 








































"Skeet" Simmonds is another one of the ignuts that belongs in this curio shop. I 
think that he has another name of some description, but darned if you ever hear it. 
Simmonds one word in describing where he lives is "You have heard of the backwoods 
haven't you? Well, I live ten miles farther back." His favorite study is Bullology, and 
his hobby is pecan hunting, or is it just an excuse? He likes to brag that he spent his 
freshman days in P. and M. (excuse me, I got my time of day mixed up.) He gives 
that as the reason that he wants to be the physical director of the Freshman's Daily 
Dozen. 

Ding Dong Bell, the guy who shoots the bull, likes to talk, tells jokes to 
fit all occasions (from the parlor to the gutter), worries the profs by his pointless 
applications and could never be left out when the goofs are assembled. He is always 
worried with some financial scheme which according to his report takes intellectual 
genius to put across. Despite his present state of worthlessness, we notice he has 
quieted down since Cousin King appeared. 

"Hog" Hodges, God's gift to women, comes forward and takes a seat to the left. 
The boy who is always making debts but never paying them, and somehow, with 
the aid of a freshman or two, he drew pay for about thirty hours of work in one 
day. His attitude toward women could not be accused of being so very angelic, yet 
the sisters flock around him and the brothers all call him "pawd." It will be a great 
relief to future freshman classes to have him absent next year. 

The pride of the Phi Delta Theta's also belongs to this trash pile. Manning Cle- 
ments is the boy who remained a barb for two years, because the frats would not 
have him. He didn't rate but sucked. When approached on politics he kindly informs 
that he has thought through both sides of the question and has reached the proper 
viewpoint. If it took "IT" to get over he would not have "IF." The ego of the 
Show-off was too mild, because Old Pan-Hellenic thinks he's the stuff. 

Rene Funchess, the girl who has caused Kuyk's hair to gray rapidly, must not be 
left out because her rating might be injured. The girl who don't give a darn what 
she says or when she says it. She is the red-hot Zeta, one who will do anything for 
a big time. 

Emily Alcala can't escape this "habeas corpus." The girl with the peroxide hair 
that reminds one of seasickness, sure tried to faw down and go boom. Her habitual 
entrance at the boys' door in chapel is rewarded by the regular freshman encore. 
If pride goes before a fall, it won't be long until she is bound to strike bottom. 













































It is both interesting and true that 

— Garnet Porter proudly proclaims, "Thomas, MY MAN!!" 

— Riley Marshall and Hazel Cutcher have had but one fuss this year, and it began 
last fall. 

— Alton Smith loves to advertise to the world that he is a barb. 

— Representative Taylor, who originally introduced the "Anti-Fraternity Bill" in 
the Legislature, was a Kappa Sigma. 

— Lucy Martin asked Rayburn Brown if he could play tennis well enough to prac- 
tice with her some day. 

— A certain girl jumped down the three floors of the Woman's building, during the 
wee hours of the morning to see Sonny Kurth. 

— Josephine McNabb, during the first few days of school, was asked if the Lorenz 
boys were ' 'barbs. ' ' She replied by saying that she thought they were Germans. 

- Mr. Young has quit using the phrase "more or less" since the soph take-off in 
chapel. 

— Bowles saw a road sign saying, "This takes you to Dallas," and sat on it for 
hours. 

— Anne Marie Doering sent the following letter to a mail order house in Europe: 

Dear Sirs: I am returning the Silver Fox Coat purchased from you, by express. It 
was too heavy to send by Parcel Post, so I cut the buttons off and put them in the 
right hand pocket. Au Revoir. 

— Jessie Thomas denies the fact that he made sixty-five on English the winter term. 

— It is better to keep silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all 
doubt. 

^The dirt in this section came from your roommate or your best friend. 



















1 
Cfr\ 



l * 



These Fair Co-Eds 

(Being a cross section of college conversation as gleaned from the language used by 
one co-ed in talking to another en route to Uncle Ed's.) 

Hi, there, ol' pawdnee! Whatcha know? I'm just worn down to a wee nub. Well, 
it's on account of that roomie of mine. She's a good ol' girl, but the woods is full of 
'em. She plays too close to the house. When I came in the other night from cockin' er 
back, she ast me where I'd been and I says, "Oh, just out with a buncha whoopees 
boysing it up!" Then she acted kinda hardhearted, and I says, "Aw, don't getcha neck 
out." And she broke down and admitted, "Well, it could have been worse." 

Sometimes I wish that double-blank hadn't had the pleasure of meeting me. Bunny! 
Oh, well. I don't mind the gray skies. But she is an egg. 

You know, some one told me that that trouble -who's always saying, "them ain't 
my barges" is the hottest thing since the Chicago fire. Say, what does that make me? 

Chump, me! A girl from the H — Council reported me for catchin' atmosphere dur- 
ing church Sunday eve, and I -wasn't even in a gaier-shifter. Say, I bet she'd make 
whoopee if she got the chance. She looks just the type that would like cuddlin'. 

I tell you, I try to be nonchalant when Miss Kuyk says, "Darlin, I know, but . . .," 
when I've tried to get out of something, but, say, whatcha gonna do about it . She's 
funny that way. But, have you ever noticed, when we have visitors she always gets 
over like a circus tent. 

Wouldn't you like to make sport and catch up? But even if I rated, I probably 
couldn't get off, 'cause my average is not gonna be so hot this term. Did you know 
Hog's was 79 z-3 last erm? It did un miss. Thought I'd faw down when I heard it. 
Listen, I can't decide which class I like worst: the one Moral Victory's in, the one 
HoleTn-One teaches, or the one where you have to pantomime milking a cow. Nut 
calls that his "pantie" class. That whips my ears down! 

There goes that girl that can't catch a joke and her little outfit. Say, she doesn't 
even know the point to the gag about the farmer diggin' post holes. 

Say, have you heard this one? — That boy who's always talkin' about the Q in 
crowbar hollered across the street to that girl who's always blowin' about Icky M. 
Baby and asked her why she was walking by herself and Jess Baby didn't seem to 
appreciate it at all. He would. 

Dontcha think our prexy's a tricky thing? When he called for the most handsome 
men in school to pass out song books, Unk said, "Congratulate me!" And it sure was 
a big up for Shortstop, too. 

Walk to town? Fool, don't be sil? It'll be sever - al days before I do that thing. 

Well, Who's your friend stopping? Kay Oh, let's ride! 

Whatcha say? Hey, get it over a little. Whew, I'm all pooped out! 



















































Minutes of Fraternity and Sorority Meetings 



Kappa Alpha 

The meeting was brought to attention by Brother Thomas staggering into the room, 
and got down to business when he informed the Brothers that it was all gone. Broth- 
ers Mikulik, Marshall and Thomas were again congratulated on having lost their pins 
and the few remaining cigar butts were relighted. Brother Warinner made a short talk 
on the loss of the chapter and the school which will occur in June with graduation. 
(Hisses.) Much regret was shown over the fact that S.U. will have no baseball team 
this season. The names of the new sisters were read out so the Brothers might become 
acquainted with them. Brother Hodges was urged to be as mannerly as possible as the 
spring elections were approaching. After a forceful talk on SOUTHERN CHIVALRY, 
the meeting slowly disintegrated. 

Phi Mu 

The meeting opened of course. The Hotchkiss Twins urged the sisters to strengthen 
themselves, as they were leaving this year. Sister Berger gave a talk on the national 
standing of Phi Mu but fell in a faint when she started on the local chapter. Sister 
Williamason moved the chapter meetings be held out by the graveyard so the girls 
would feel more at home. Sister Buller said she thought a little advertisement like an 
electric sign would get the frat in the public eye. Sister Williamson suggested a broad- 
casting station and she promised to wear her pin to her home in London to speed the 
fraternity's fame to the west. The meeting closed with ' 'We CAN'T GET THE ONES 
WE WANT." 






























Kappa Sigma 



The meeting barely opened as Brother McCrabb had just returned from San Antonio 
with his samples. Brother Dickson moved that an assessment of 2.0 cents be levied to 
buy Brother Stafford a new set of blocks and a rattle. Brother McDaniel reminded the 
chapter that a new excuse would have to be thought up as "Teet" Williams had at 
last made his average. A committee was appointed by Brother Dickson to work out a 
new byword for the chapter as the familiar "Pawdno" was becoming obsolete. The 
Brothers were informed by Brother Gillett that the Elks now have a few more chap- 
ters than the Kappa Sigs (sobs and emotion). Brother Dickson informed the chapter, 
of the great loss they would suffer with his graduation. (Open weeping.) After the 
serving of refreshments the meeting slowly closed; Brother Dickson barely in the 
chair. 



Zeta Tau Alpha 



Alpha Delta Pi 



The meeting opened with "The One I Love Belongs To Somebody Else." Several of 
the girls wept during the song. Sister Anderson remarked on the growing social 
prestige of the chapter, she having dated Bunny Cook. Sister Holmes made a motion 




The Sisters of the Zeta Tau Alpha leaving the call of the "Luckies" drifted in for a 
meeting. Roll was called and each answered with her favorite brand. Sister Hodges 
was campused for disturbing the meeting trying to teach Sister Read the latest dance 
step from BIG B. Sister Deffebach made the motion that some pin be designed for those 
rushing Zeta. Sister Wanda Smith suggested "by their Fords ye shall know them." 
The funds were reported low. Sister Porter made a motion that the treasury be filled 
with special assessment on the "pinned" pledges and initiates. Sister Jean Smith ob- 
jected. Sister Ewing announced that the alumnae had been writing letters in regard to 
the size of the chapter and moved that the membership be restricted to 49, which does 
not sound as bad as 50. The meeting adjourned for pin-getting practice. 



Phi Delta Theta 

As several of the Brothers were entertaining in the Little Store the meeting was 
called to order. After the usual report on dates, B-Br-Brother B-B-Bell rose to speak 
and the chapter fell into a fit of laughter, causing time out to be called. After the song, 
"I Learned About Women From Her," by Brother Gafford, Brother Clements burst 
into tears but reconciled himself by noting that his pin was gone. The Brothers were 
urged not to ring the Alarm Bell except at the proper time, as the neighbors were com- 
plaining. Brothers Sharp and Bell congratulated each other on their success in poli- 
tics. The Brothers were urged to buy as many of Seger Ellis' records as possible and 
to remind everyone that he is a Phi as it might help some. The meeting ended in a dead 
faint as Brothers Young and Kurth walked into the room. 



















that the sorority give the four automobile pledges a vote of thanks for the social 
prestige the Buicks have lent the sorority. Sister Davis said that she'd probably not be 
back in school (loud cheers). Sister Martin said that she'd probably finish (still louder 
cheers). The slogan, "When Better Buicks Are Built We Will Pledge Them," was 
adopted. Sister Tarver was awarded an Ingersoll wrist watch for attendance of four 
meetings this year already. The motion was made that the freshmen be instructed in 
rushing — especially in keeping the brains out of the Zeta chapter. The song, "I'm 
Wild About Horns on Automobiles," was sung. The meeting adjourned because the 
pledges were honking. 



Pi Kappa Alpha 



The meeting opened in the usual disorderly manner with Brother Stevenson in the 
chair. (Army's old piano stool.) After the opening hymn, "Down in the Corn Field," 
the minutes of the last meeting were read and adopted unanimously, both members 
voting aye. Brother Moet led the chapter in a short prayer ending with these touching 
words, "Lord send us more men." Under proposals for membership a large portion of 
the eligible but undesirable students were brought up, but nothing could be done as 
most of them had already been offered open bids. Brother Keene moved that a certain 
man be pledged as the Phis had taken him to the house for lunch. The motion quickly 
passed. A committee was appointed to learn the man's name. The house manager was 
asked to inspect the next bushel of pledge buttons before accepting them, as there were 
several faulty ones in the last batch. A committee was appointed to hold off the in- 
stallment collector. Brother Landrum moved that the chapter attend church in a body 
next Sunday (laughter). The motion died for lack of a second. The brothers 
congratulated each other on the success of their advertising campaign and a motion 
was passed to install a larger billboard on the house but died for lack of funds. After a 
short but forceful talk on the subject, "Power in Promiscuity," by Brother Stevenson, 
the meeting was adjourned in order that the men might get acquainted with the 
pledges. 

Delta Delta Delta 

The meeting failed to open for a long time but finally Sister Baskin arrived from Mc- 
Innis'. The weekly report on "What Have I Done to Run The School" was given by 
each member. Sister Stocklas made a motion that every girl run for some office or be 
expelled from the chapter. Sister Pope suggested that a "Shake a Hundred Hands a 
Day" campaign be organized. Sister Fox said she had a Phi brother or two and 
through them could probably arrange some dates with the Phis for the girls, which 
would be a big social "up." Most of the members said they'd rather not get the "up" 
that way; some gave a vote of thanks to Sister Fox. The motion was made that the 
chapter affiliate with some labor unions because of its working girls. Sister Baskin 
spoke on the wonderful store of material in the San Jacinto Literary Society that has 
been overlooked. Sister Payne spoke on the deplorable lack of transportation in the 
chapter. Sister Burgin made a motion that Delta Delta Delta follow the plan of Alpha 
Delta Pi and get "auto pledges." Sister Doering said she did not see any use of meeting 
any longer so the meeting was adjourned. 









































;~X4 WJJ^ZD^JUM: 



































































Editor s Page 




The 192.9 Sou'wester is finished! April the first has arrived 
bringing the conclusion of a grand and glorious editorial year 
for the 1919 Sou'wester. Why? Because the task of compiling 
the book this year has been a pleasure, never to be erased from 
the editor's memory. It has burned itself into the very heart 
and soul! One whole year of life, night and day, has been 
poured into these pages. 

It is all over! A peculiar kind of thrill tingles along the 
whole body of the editor each time he realizes that it is really 
done. After looking through the pages a few times, the 1919 
Sou'wester will, perhaps, be packed away, buried in an old 
trunk or closet, torn up or lost. What was the use of spending a 
whole year of this short life for such a dreadful conclusion? 

The Sou'wester is given to you cheerfully and with the 
hope that the year's faithful work will bring a few happy and 
pleasant moments to your life while you live this college year 
all over again. Forget yourself these few moments and live as 
though you were in a dream world where you used to love and 
hate, laugh and cry, gain and lose, work and play. 

The Sou'wester staff has worked faithfully and hard. They 
have denied themselves pleasures, sacrificed courses in order 
that the Sou'wester might bring joy to you. Never has an 
editor had a more loyal staff who have proved themselves to be 
real friends. 

To try to thank each person individually who has helped 
compile this volume would take several pages, but none the 
less their aid is appreciated: faculty, students and friends. 

Please forgive us, we pray, for any mistakes made, because 
we were doing our best. We did not mean to ever be bitter but 
only desired to play and point out the humorous truth. If it is 
the truth, promise to do better; if not, laugh and tell the gang 
about the funny joke. 

It is our most sincere and honest wish that your life may de- 
velop into the happiest, highest and best, both here at South- 
western and elsewhere. 

— Joe Humphrey 




























































jsgr** 



e 

5 






WHEN in after years you turn the pages 
of this Sou'wester, the class history of 
Southwestern's 192.8-192.9 school year and the 
many photographs recall to your memory the 
faces of old friends and acquaintances, may 
this familiar slogan, "The Sign of Good 
Clothes," that has appeared in all your col- 
lege publications again come to mind, and 
your friends and supporters at this store be 
remembered by you as this store that features 
the newest of college styles while they are new. 




The Toggery 






4 



£<r^- 



;o 



**$& 



o; 



Compliments of 



JESSE H. JONES 



Houston, Texas 









Sfc>" — — — — * rM 



Compliments 

and 
Greetings 

of 

J. WEST, JR. 

and 

WESLEY W. WEST 









MR. CRONE MR. HOYT 

For the benefit of our custo- 
mers we have an absolutely 
sanitary shop. It is at all 
times a respectable place for 
ladies. We appreciate your 
patronage. 

Bank Barber Shop 

MR. RHODES MR. BARTLETT 



2 j 






The Most Modern 

DRY CLEANING PLANT 

in Central Texas 

Wishes You a Very Pleasant Vacation 



i 



We want to thank you for your patronage 
of the past year. We trust that we have 
pleased you. Next year send us your dresses, 
suits, sweaters, etc., for prompt satisfactory 

service. 



TROY LAUNDRY & 
DRY CLEANING PLANT 



Phone ii 









M6^ : **!X> 



? 



The Photos in this Issue 

Sou'wester 

"were made by 

R. J. STONE 

Photographer 
Georgetown - Texas 



Each negative has been carefully registered and 
filed. Pictures may be made from them at any time. 



a. 



'4 






58THI — *e$& 



BUSY BEE CAFE 



We are proud to say that 
we have one of the most 
modern cafes in central 
Texas. 

Southwestern students add 
to the life and pep of our 
organization. It is our pleas- 
ure to serve you. 






gggv ^ *oa« 

e 9 



.*>. 



McINNISDRUGCO. 

77^ Rexall Store 



11 The Best in Drug Store Goods" 
' ' 77^ i?f jf z'# D/v/g iY^r Service" 



4 



IP" ^i 



SHERWOOD & LAMB 

STOCKS - BONDS - COTTON 

401-406 State National Bank Building 



Private Wire Service 



SETH S. LAMB Houston, Texas 

(Sole Owner) 



Compliments of 

J. W. REYNOLDS 



Houston, Texas 









%' 



*^>?4 



<r», 



Alterations and Hats 
T. P. Miles 




Pleating and Finishing 
Woodie Patrick 



Miles Bros. 

Dry Cleaners, Hatters 
and Dyers 

Telephone 262 

(Sixteen years of service) 

R. L. LOGAN, Owner 



Cleaning and Dyeing 
John C. Jenkins 



Finishing 
Bovce Crimm 



PALACE THEATRE 



"Where Georgetown is Entertained" 



ACME DRY CLEANERS 

"Watch for the Yellow Car" 
FANCY CLEANING AND DYEING 






MILES DAVIS 



BRYAN DAWSON 



4 









Smart Persons 

DEPEND ON 

SCARBROUGH'S 

IW Fashion Leadership 

Smart Persons know that Scarbroughs 
chooses for and -presents to University students 
the most significant new versions of the "col- 
lege mode." That is the reason that each 
week brings us so many students from South- 
western. 

E. M. Scarbrough & Sons 

AUSTIN, TEXAS 



1 






J. R. Reed Music 


Von Boeckmann- 


Company 


Jones Co. 


te^£ 


i 


"Your Friends" 


te^zl 


Printers and Bookbinders 


Austin's Leading Music House. 




Radios, Pianos, Phonographs, 


i 


Sheet Music, Records and 




Band Instruments 






Austin Texas 



i 



*j>j« 






*?28g 



e% 



NATURAL GAS 



F#r 



Cleanliness - Economy - Dependability 



Community Natural Gas Co. 



No Home is Modem without Automatic Gas Hot Water Service 



Compliments of 

EDENS BROS. 

Grocery 



H. A. Edens C. O. Edens 






Wilcox Grocery 



i 



TWO PHONES 



9i 



( Ji 



a 



**J8S 






2. 



Compliments of 



GARNER- AL VIS CO. 

T/>f Dependable Store 
GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 



Compliments of 

The Southwest Telephone Co. 

District Office: Georgetown, Texas 



WILCOX BROS. 

JEWELRY & BOOK STORE 

We carry all university books and supplies. A nice line 

of jewelry. We are ex-students of Southwestern 

and therefore know your wants. 









f> 'n 



I 



One Quality 



Regardless of what your purchase at Hertzberg's may be, 
you have the assurance and satisfaction of knowing that 
behind it is the Hertzberg standard of quality. A stand- 
ard which has been zealously maintained and applied to 
every item in our stocks for more than half-a-century. 

This extra guarantee of satisfaction is yours, whether 
your purchase be Class Pins or Insignia designed and 
manufactured in our own manufacturing department, a 
lovely jewel-piece, a watch, or a simple, inexpensive 
gift. And, always, there is Hertzberg's helpful service 
based on many years study of your needs and how best to 
meet them to your satisfaction. 



Diamonds 


Class Phis 


Fountain Pens 


Watches 


Insignia 


Pen and Pencil Sets 


Jewelry 


Trophies 


Desk Sets 


Silverware 


Loving Cups 


Gifts 



HERTZBERG'S 

"at the sign of the clock" 

HOUSTON ST. AT ST. MARYS 

SAN ANTONIO 
TEXAS 






iggv*. — - — ^ — -=^^^=^^^^= <^m 



We show our appreciation of student trade by 
giving the best courteous banking service. 



The City National Bank 

of Georgetown 



is 



Safe 

Sincere 
Serviceable 

Offi c e r s 

Owen W. Sherrill, President 
H. H. Onstot, Vice President 
Ike O. Williams, Cashier 

Paul T. Erickson, Bookkeeper 

Miss Ola McLaughlin, Secretary 

Directors 

J. B. Duke 
John D. Hudson Owen W. Sherrill 

Jones Wallin Fred Vinther 

H. H. Onstot Emzy D. Williams 






/4 Wood For Every Purpose 



Southern Yellow Pine 
Southern Hardwoods 



Your dealer can supply you with the 

finest quality of all Southern Woods 

manufactured by "Kirby" mills. 



KIRBY LUMBER COMPANY 

Houston, Texas 



} \ 



gfgv *fISg 

? 9 



The Farmers State Bank 

Georgetown, Texas 



Georgetown, the home of Southwestern Uni- 
versity, is a good place to live. It is the best 
residence town in Texas. 

This bank will appreciate your account, wheth- 
er large or small. 

Our banking facilities are the best and are all 
at the service of our customers. 

If you live here, come in and see us. You will 
be welcome. 

If you live elsewhere, write us for any informa- 
tion or service and your letters will receive 
prompt attention. 



DIRECTORS 

E. G. Gillett, President 
W. L. Price, Cashier 
D. W. Wilcox 
W. G. McDonald 
John S. Gillett 
H. N. Graves 






3$r*"=- — — - — — — ^ *■%% 



COOPER'S 



BEST 



COFFEE 



"Quality Tells" 



As you Journey Thru Life 



the road will be smoother and the 
progress more rapid if you carry a 
reputation for reliability. 

Reliability is the Keynote 



upon which our institution has 
prospered and attained the leader- 
ship it enjoys. 



R. T. DENNIS & CO., Inc 

in WACO since 1886 
WACO TEXAS 










CERTAINLY- 

SOUTHWESTERN 

ENGRAVING COMPANY 




FORT WORTH 
DALLAS 

HOUSTON 
BEAUMONT 
WICHITA FALLS 
AMARTLLO 
~T U LS A 
ATLANTA 
MACON 





















t 




GIVE HER A SHOT 
OF- 



HUMBLE 





ASOLINE 

And Watch Her Move 



When your bus — old or new— 
stows a drink of Humble Flash- 
like Gasoline away in her craw, 
get ready for things to happen. 
Press on the starter button 
and feel the motor wake to life 
instantly — eager, ready to go! 
Throw in the gears and clutch- 
push down the accelerator — and 
experience a thrill of power such 
as you never imagined possible— 
except in a higher priced car, us- 
ing premium fuel ! 
Digs her toes in and flashes down 



the road — greets the mile posts 

with a smile laughs at the hills 

—takes you where you want to 
go and back again with sustained 
smooth, velvet ease! 
Humble Flashli ke Gasoline burns 
clean; leaves little carbon. Re- 
duces valve pitting. Contains no 
gum to clog carburetor jets or 
cause valves to stick. Affords 
you in every drop — mile after 
mile — Flashlike performance! Costs 
no more than ordinary gasoline. 
Look for the Humble Signs. 



HUMBLE OIL & REFINING CO. 












¥ 



DR. W.J. BURCHAM 

Dentist 
Georgetown, Texas 



YEARWOOD & JOHNSON 
GARAGE 

Expert Repair Work on All Cars 

Gasoline, Oils, Accessories 

Wrecker Service 



Phone 106 



Georgetown 



*^2ag 



? 



GEORGETOWN ELECTRIC 
SHOE SHOP 

Repairs Shoes While You Wait 
Guaranteed Work 



Compliments of 
HENDERSON S GARAGE 

Georgetown, Texas 



Compliments of 
WILSON COUNTY SUN 



Compliments of 
A. A. DICKSON 
Ballinger, Texas 






KILGORE, ROGERS & 
MONTGOMERY 

Attorneys at Law 

JOHN E. KILGORE GUY ROGERS 

A. D. MONTGOMERY 

Wichita Falls, Texas 



Compliments of 
BILL GILLITT 



4 






V 






DR. H. L. PATTERSON 

Dentist 

Georgetown, Texas 



DR. HOBSON MARTIN 

Dentist 

Georgetown, Texas 



E. A. MILAM, M.D. 

1907 Amicable Building 
Waco, Texas 



When in Temple 
Eat at the 

MOSS ROSE CAFE 



DR. W. H. MOSES 

University Physician 



Compliments of 

YOUNG'S DAIRY 

accredited herd 

Georgetown, Texas 



T. B. GREENWOOD 

Attorney at Law 

Wichita, Texas 






When in Waco — Visit Us 



ELITE CAFE 

Colias Bros., Proprietors 



609-10 Austin Ave. Waco, Texas 



,\ 






*v£Vi- 



n 













AMONG SOUTHERN HOTELS 

(UNDER SAME OWNERSHIP) 

In the heart of activities, yet quiet and refined, The Rice of Houston, 
The Lamar of Houston and the Worth of Fort Worth are supreme 
among southern hostelries, and offer charming hospitality and con- 
veniences which are famous the country over. 

The Rice — Houston 

iooo Rooms 
Rates $1.50 per day and up. Largest Cafeteria in the 
South. Beautiful Francis I Dining Room. Roof Garden 
open during summer. Coffee Shop and Lunch Room. 
Private meeting and Banquet Rooms. Barber Shop and 

B. F. Orr, Manager 

The Worth — Fort Worth 
300 Rooms with hath. $i.oo per day and 



I 



Beautv Parlor. 

The Lamar — Houston 

500 Rooms — Apartments, Suites, Single 
Rooms. Rates $1.50 per day and up. 
Southern style cafeteria. Waffle and 
Sandwich shop. Barber Shop and Beauty 
Parlor. Meeting and Banquet rooms. 
R. Bruce Carter, Manager. 



up. Cafe, Coffee Shop, Barber Shop, 
Beauty Parlor, offering the utmost in 
service. The Worth is the preferred stop- 
ping place in Fort Worth. 

Paul V. Williams, Manager. 






:|*^J 



2 

2& 



£fjgV' ! ^M 



V' 



:o* ^ 



I 



Ccmpliments 
of 

E. L. CRAIN 

Houston, Texas 



Compliments 
of 

Bankers Mortgage Company 

Houston, Texas 

Capital and Surplus. . . . $2., 600,000.00 
Real Estate Loans and Investments 

OFFICERS 

Jesse H. Jones, President F. J. Heyne, Vice President 

N. E. Meador, Vice President W. W. Moore, Vice Pres. & Treas. 

J. M. Rockwell, Vice President A. H. Parker, Sec. & Asst. -Treas. 

Will F. Miller, Vice-President L. H. Williams, Asst. -Secretary 

Andrews, Streetman, Logue & Mobley, Counsel 



y 



K 



£2.~ _fj. 



r *^ 



5 



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General Office 
Houston, Texas 

Branch Yards: 

Albany 

Amarillo 

Bardwell 

Big Spring 

Cisco 

Coleman 

Colorado 

Friona 

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Hereford 

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"FOOTS" ROCKWELL-1922 

says "Howdy" and 

"See 



ROCKWELL BROS. & CO. 

Lumbermen 
FOR GOOD BUILDING MATERIALS" 



Llano 

Lueders 

Midland 

Moran 

Plainview 

Rotan 

Slaton 

Tulia 

Waxahachie 

Wilson 

New Mexico 
Portales 

Oklahoma 

Bochito 

Calera 






The Wisdom of the World is Stored in Books; 
Read Good Books and You Increase 
Knowledge. 

Books of All Publishers and Service Unexcelled 

Send for our complete catalogue 

Publishing House M. E. Church South 

LAMAR & WHITMORE, Agents 
"The South' s Largest Book Store'' 



1108 Commerce Street 



3 



DALLAS 









Sir** 

to 



V 



1 




Know your Neighbor 



There is a man in your community 
who merits your acquaintance. He 
is a specialist in an age of special- 
ization. And his specialty is serv- 
ing your automobile to help you 
get the most possible miles. 

He knows that his success and 
prosperity depend on the quality of 
his service and the merchandise he 
sells. He elected to sell the new and 
better Texaco Gasoline and clean, 
clearTexaco Golden Motor Oil Ex- 
perience taughthim that they 
are superior to other motor 
fuels and lubricants; the new 
and better Texaco Gasoline 



FULL BODY 



UEAN-CIEAO PUBE 




because it forms a dry gas, is true 
"high test", and has remarkable 
anti-knock qualities which were 
achieved without the addition of 
chemicals; the clean, clear 
Texaco Golden MotorOil 
because it forms no carbon 
and has that full heat-re- 
sisting body so necessary 
for today's faster engines. 
When he recommends 
Texaco Motor Oil and 
Gasoline you may 
be sure there is sin- 
cere honesty in the 
advice he gives you. 




THE TEXAS COMPANY, TEXACO PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



TEXACO 



GASOLINE™,/ 
M OTO R OIL 






i 



SIT* 



? 



The Great Business ! 

BRANTLEY-DR^ 



& 



FORT WORTH IS GROWING 

Fort Worth is doubtless one of the fastest-growing cities in the United States. 
Fort Worth has experienced one of the greatest years in its history from many 
standpoints, and it stands now with every indication pointing to a greater and 
more successful year. New buildings are soaring skyward every day. Our mag- 
nificent trade territory is expanding by leaps and bounds. New industries, 
firms and individuals are moving to Fort Worth daily. Never in Fort Worth's 
history was the opportunity as great as it is today. An era of unprecedented 
prosperity for this city, even greater than the previous year, is predicted by our 
great business leaders. Fort Worth calls to you. It is the city of OPPORTU- 
NITY. Its opportunities are attracting young people from all over the South. 
It offers you, too, a chance to get a start toward success; because of Fort 
Worth's prosperity and great achievements hundreds of young people come 
here every year. They want to learn and they want to work; they want to 
earn more, and have more, and live better. Brantley-Draughon calls to you; 
if you have ambition and energy, here is your opportunity and it will pay you 
to come to Fort Worth NOW and take training for a lucrative position. 

FIRST IN TEXAS 

Choose a College in Which a Degree as Well as 
a Diploma May Be Earned 



Brantley-Draughon is the first business school 
in Texas granting Commercial Degrees (State 
Authorized) and as far as we know the only 
one in the State granting these degrees now. 
Consequently, isn't it logical that because of 
our teaching staff and facilities for giving in- 



struction of this grade we can offer you far 
better training than institutions giving only 
ordinary business college instructions even 
though you want to take onlv a Bookkeeping, 
Shorthand, Secretarial or other similar course. 



Administration Course Complete Business Course 

Leading to Degree of Leading to Degree of 

Master of Accounts (M. A.) Bachelor of Accounts (B. Accts.) 



Higher Accounting Course 

Leading to Degree of 
Bachelor of Accounts (B. Accts.) 



Secretarial Science Course 

Leading to Degree of 

Bachelor of Secretarial Science (B.S.S.) 



UQ^ 



ng School of the South 

jHON COLLEGE 



1 



A GOOD 

The Right Graduate for the 

The question of making the right 
start — getting the right position with 
the right employer — is of such vital 
importance that it is secondary only 
to that of getting the most thorough 
training for your work before you 
take it up. With the best training in 
the world — with a world of enthusi- 
asm — with personality and initiative 
to spare — you may waste months or 
even years of your life unless you find 
a way to make the right start. 

That's why we have often said that 
our Placement Service — although it 
is free to all our graduates — is worth 
many times the entire cost of one of 
our courses. Those in charge of this 
service have made a study of placing 
young people in the right positions 
with the right employers. 

Usually, therefore, we do not find it 



POSITION 

Right Position Is Our Rule 

difficult, when one of our students is 
ready for a position, to place him in 
the very position for which he is best 
fitted — the position which he charac- 
terizes as "the place I have always 
wanted." 

Somewhere, with our host of bus- 
iness friends, there is doubtless a good 
position awaiting you. Placed in that 
position, you will be able to go on 
and up the ladder to success. 

Why not start your training for 
that position now? We'll study you 
while you are studying business, and 
we feel rather safe in predicting that 
when you have completed your course 
the right position will be waiting. 
We've helped so many others, there 
doesn't seem to be a reason in the 
world why we should fail in your 
case, if you will take the right course. 



Send for FREE Literature 



Remember, we do not have now and have 
never had any branch schools. We are not con- 
nected, in any manner, with other schools of 
similar name located in different parts of the 
country. We center our efforts and thoughts in 
conducting one select, successful school, and 
that is here in Fort Worth, where it is neces- 
sary for you to come in order to get the benefit 
of our training. We are affiliated with about 
three hundred Accredited schools, members of 
the National Association of Accredited Com- 
mercial Schools in the United States and Can- 
ada, which absolutely guarantees you the 
very best to be had. 

When you enroll for a business course, you 
are taking a step upon which your whole fu- 
ture depends. You must use the greatest care 
in choosing the school, and the course you are 
to take. We earnestly believe you could not 
choose a better school from every standpoint 
than ours. Because of this, we want you to be- 



come thoroughly familiar with our school, its 
equipment, its faculty and its courses. 

We should like to have you visit the school 
at any time. You will always find a welcome 
awaiting you, and someone to show you 
through, tell you of the work going forward 
in the various departments and answer any 
questions you may wish to ask regarding any 
courses. 

If you cannot conveniently visit the school 
at the present time, we should be glad to send 
you our free literature, or to answer by letter 
any questions you may wish to ask. 

We feel that when you are thoroughly ac- 
quainted with our school — when you have 
compared it from every angle with other 
schools — you will elect to place your future 
in our hands. Just write and we'll send you 
complete information — FREE — and without 
obligation of any kind. 









V 






Compliments of 



E. L. KURTH 



KELTYS, TEXAS 










WE WANT MEN/ 

Men who have been fired with that foresight and ambition to first 
prepare themselves mentally for the future. They must possess 
character, personality, and presentability. Mentally alert to the 
possibilities surrounding them, and a^ressive enough to&rasp them. 
01 We want men who are energetic enough to cover the field thor- 
oughly with the interests of the people they serve and the insti- 
tution they represent first in mind. <?* GfTo you who have finished 
the work in this institution of learning and feel capable of the 
above requirements, we invite you to consult with us re&ardin& 
your future in a field where real service can be rendered 
with rewards commensurate to the effort. 

For further details and appointment concerning a genuine op- 
portunity to build the foundation of your future success, write 

SOUTHERN UNION LIFE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 

FOfel WORTH, TEXAS 

JA5 L M1STROT PRESIDENT TOM POYNOR VICE-PRESIDENT 





sir* 1 — ^___^__ =^m. 



Compliments of 



UNIVERSITY STORE 



THE BELFORD LUMBER CO. 

Lumber Building Materials Contractors 



Get our estimate on your ivork 



TEXAS SERVICE STATION 

E. L. Munson, Proprietor 
Texaco Products Dependable Driverless Cars 

HOOD TIRES & TUBES 









**•$% 



9 



STROMBERG-HOFFMAN & CO. 

Georgetown, Texas 

Better Dry Goods and Ready-to-Wear 

for 

Men, Women, Boys and Girls 

The friendship and patronage of University men and 
women who have favored us through the years is an 
appreciated memory of our experience in merchandising. 
Wherever we go we meet these men and women now in 
the professions and business avocations contributing to 
the upbuilding of Texas and the nation. We are still 
here to serve faithfully in our line. 

Your Friends 

Stromberg-Hoffman & Co. 

Georgetown, Texas 

"The Home of Southwestern University" 





COED FR0C£5^§^ 

-SHOVJN-Wg&E-rxaUSlVELY '' ; 



ft 



Gifts for Graduation 



ft 



The Store where Southwestern Students 
are always welcome. Devoted to making 
shopping a pleasure by supplying in a 
friendly manner at economical prices. 

THE FAIR 












The Staff of the Sou'wester, } zg wishes 
to gratefully acknowledge the kindness 
of one, who by her friendly interest and 
material support, has proven herself to 
be one of Southwestern loyal ex-students: 



MRS. J. J. PERKINS 

Wichita Falls, Texas 



C 









THE ALCOVE 

where the 

SOUTHWESTERN STUDENTS 

are always welcome 



THE HOME OF 

Delicious Sandwiches Cold Drinks Cigars Cigarettes 

Candies Music 



GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 



Compliments of 

BEN FRANKLIN CHAIN STORE 

F. E. BUCKHOLZ, Manager 
Georgetown, Texas 



Q akowitr T Xroc . 

ON MAIN AT RUSK 

"The South' s Greatest Store for Men and Boys — with Shops for Women too" 

} s 






THE FOX COMPANY 




The Kodak Work in the Sou'wester 
is a sample of our development. We 
appreciate the work sent us, Sou'- 
wester, and would like to have you 
visit our plant when in 
San Antonio. 



ESTABLISHED 
1866 




^ setting 'noiirtoa 

fromtbedaijsof the 

Covered wo^on 

3&Fmsr N ational Rank 



•«^298 



9 



Dozens of newest styles in fine 
portraiture — frames , miniatures , 
oil, tints, etc. 



UNIVERSITY 
STUDIO 

Opposite Texas U. Campus 
AUSTIN 



Texas' Foremost College Studio 






JOHN BREMOND 

Roaster of 

High Grade 
Coffees 



AUSTIN, TEXAS 



i«*»SK 



SB?** 

? 



m*g% 



OS 



FOR FIVE YEARS IT HAS 
BEEN THE PRIVILEGE OF 
THE REIN COMPANY TO 
ASSIST IN THE PLAN AND 
TO PRODUCE THE SOU'- 
WESTER 



The binnacle decoration on the cover, the oriental atmos- 
phere, the colors, the borders, the well chosen verses, even the 
graceful Garamond type, all, we believe, carry the theme of 
Sinbad the Sailor thru his adventures and you thru the 
chapters pleasantly. 




Printed and Bound by 



THE REIN COMPANY 

Houston, Texas 

■f 

Printers of the 192$, 1926, igzy, 1928, 1929 Sou' westers 






$2, 







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